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Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

The Foreign Policy Diaspora-From Jerusalem to Washington

The State of the Union Address and Bush's second Inaugural Address focused U.S. and international attention on Natan Sharansky, author of The...

The State of the Union Address and Bush’s second Inaugural Address focused U.S. and international attention on Natan Sharansky, author of The Case for Democracy: The Power of Freedom to Overcome Tyranny & Terror. Pundits and reporters noted that the president’s lofty rhetoric about “ending tyranny in our world” and guaranteeing “freedom from fear” echoed Sharansky’s language.

In his book Sharansky makes that case that U.S. foreign policy should be guided at least as much by ideals as national interests. Part of that idealism should be a mission to export freedom to countries and societies living in fear, focusing primarily on the Arab world.1 According to Sharansky, the United States should not only prevent terrorist and terrorist states from obtaining weapons of mass destruction, but should also “understand how powerful weapons of mass construction can be in the hands of the free world.”

No doubt that Bush and Sharansky, a Soviet

Citations

Tom Barry, "Natan Sharansky and George W. Bush: The Foreign Policy Diaspora-From Jerusalem to Washington," IRC Right Web (Somerville, MA: International Relations Center, February 8, 2005).

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Frank Gaffney, director of the hardline neoconservative Center for Security Policy, is a longtime advocate of aggressive U.S. foreign policies, bloated military budgets, and confrontation with the Islamic world.


Ilan Berman is vice president of the American Foreign Policy Council, a think tank that promotes hawkish security polices and appears to be closely associated with the U.S. “Israel Lobby.”


Randal Fort, an assistant secretary for intelligence and research in the State Department during the second term of George W. Bush’s presidency, is director at the Raytheon Corporation.


Robert Kagan, a cofounder of the Project for the New American Century, is a neoconservative policy pundit and historian based at the Brookings Institution.


A neoconservative pundit and former federal prosecutor, McCarthy argues that Islam is inherently radical and thus a threat to the United States.


Former Sen. Jim Talent (R-MO), a stalwart advocate of Pentagon spending now based at the right-wing Heritage Foundation, says he would have voted for the Iraq War even if he had known the Bush administration’s claims about WMDs were false.


Michael Ledeen, a “Freedom Scholar” at the neoconservative Foundation for Defense of Democracies, has long been obsessed with getting the U.S. to force regime change in Tehran.


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