Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Privacy Policy

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Right Web has a firm commitment to safeguarding the privacy of our visitors personal information. Personal information is information about an identifiable individual. This includes information about your product and service subscriptions and usage.

Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information

The personal information we collect is used to provide our services, for billing, for identification and authentication, for the general operation and improvement of our services, and to respond to inquiries, and is not used, shared with or sold to other organizations, except: to provide the products or services you’ve requested; or when we have your permission.

We collect the e-mail addresses of those who communicate with us via e-mail, aggregate information on what pages consumers access or visit, information volunteered by the consumer, such as survey information and/or site registrations. We will not disclose, sell, trade, rent, or otherwise reveal our supporters’ email addresses with a third party.

If you supply us with your postal address on-line you may receive periodic mailings from us with information on new reports or activities of Right Web..

Persons who supply us with their telephone numbers on-line will only receive telephone contact from us with information regarding orders they have placed on-line.

If you do not wish to receive such email or mailings, please let us know by e-mailing us at the address below.

From time to time, we may use customer information for new, unanticipated uses not previously disclosed in our privacy notice. If our information practices change at some time in the future we will contact you before we use your data for these new purposes to notify you of the policy change and to provide you with the ability to opt out of these new uses.

Upon request we provide site visitors with access to all information [including proprietary information] that we maintain about them.

Security

The security of your personal information is important to us. Our service has security measures in place to protect the loss, misuse and alteration of the information under our control. We do not store credit card information in our database. We follow generally accepted industry standards to protect the personal information submitted to us, both during transmission and once we receive it. When we transfer and receive certain types of sensitive information such as financial information, we redirect visitors to a secure server. We have appropriate security measures in place in our physical facilities to protect against the loss, misuse or alteration of information that we have collected from you at our site.

Links to Other Sites

This site contains links to other sites. We are not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of such other Web sites.

Questions

If you feel that this site is not following its stated information policy, you may contact us at the email below, state or local chapters of the Better Business Bureau, state or local consumer protection office.

We can be reached via e-mail at: rightweb.ips@gmail.com

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Featured Profiles

The Foreign Policy Initiative, founded in 2009 by a host of neoconservative figures, was a leading advocate for a militaristic and Israel-centric U.S. foreign policies.


Billionaire investor Paul Singer is the founder and CEO of the Elliott Management Corporation and an important funder of neoconservative causes.


Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) is known for his hawkish views on foreign policy and close ties to prominent neoconservatives.


Ron Dermer is the Israeli ambassador to the United States and a close confidante of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.


Blackwater Worldwide founder Erik Prince is notorious for his efforts to expand the use of private military contractors in conflict zones.


U.S. Defense Secretary James “Mad Dog” Mattis is a retired U.S Marine Corps general and combat veteran who served as commander of U.S. Central Command during 2010-2013 before being removed by the Obama administration reportedly because of differences over Iran policy.


Mark Dubowitz, an oft-quoted Iran hawk, is the executive director of the neoconservative Foundation for Defense of Democracies.


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From the Wires

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The time has come for a new set of partnerships to be contemplated between the United States and Middle East states – including Iran – and between regimes and their peoples, based on a bold and inclusive social contract.


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Erik Prince is back. He’s not only pitching colonial capitalism in DC. He’s huckstering ex-SF-led armies of sepoys to wrest Afghanistan, Yemen, Libya and perhaps, if he is ever able to influence likeminded hawks in the Trump administration, even Iran back from the infidels.


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Encouraged by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s statement late last month that Washington favors “peaceful” regime change in Iran, neoconservatives appear to be trying to influence the internal debate by arguing that this is Trump’s opportunity to be Ronald Reagan.


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When asked about “confidence in the U.S. president to do the right thing in world affairs,” 22 percent of those surveyed as part of a recent Pew Research Center global poll expressed confidence in Donald Trump and 74 percent expressed no confidence.


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A much-awaited new State Department volume covering the period 1951 to 1954 does not reveal much new about the actual overthrow of Mohammad Mossadeq but it does provide a vast amount of information on US involvement in Iran.


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As debate continues around the Trump administration’s arms sales and defense spending, am new book suggests several ways to improve security and reduce corruption, for instance by increasing transparency on defense strategies, including “how expenditures on systems and programs align with the threats to national security.”


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Lobelog We walked in a single file. Not because it was tactically sound. It wasn’t — at least according to standard infantry doctrine. Patrolling southern Afghanistan in column formation limited maneuverability, made it difficult to mass fire, and exposed us to enfilading machine-gun bursts. Still, in 2011, in the Pashmul District of Kandahar Province, single…


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