Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Whither Congress and the war; Midge Decter; Center for Security Policy; Rumsfeld’s new home—th

FEATURED ARTICLE

Iraq After Petraeus: The More Things Change …
By John Isaacs

Gen. David Petraeus and Amb. Ryan Crocker’s defense of the "surge" strategy confirmed the divide in Congress over the Iraq War. While their testimony may have given President Bush some breathing space to avoid making hard decisions on the direction of the war, pending legislation in on Capitol Hill will undoubtedly put Republicans in an uncomfortable situation. Although many voters may be disappointed over the lack of congressional progress regarding the war, they are unlikely to swing back to Republicans if more than 100,000 U.S. troops still remain in the country 14 months from now. Read full story.

FEATURED PROFILES

Midge Decter
The matriarch of the neoconservative Podhoretz clan, and a leading foreign policy hawk and anti-feminist cultural critic for decades, Decter describes Donald Rumsfeld as a "studmuffin."

Hoover Institution
Stanford’s Hoover Institution is one of the most prominent right-wing think tanks in the country, particularly on economic and foreign policy issues, and has served as a brain trust for the last several Republican administrations.

Donald Rumsfeld
The former defense secretary and architect of the Iraq War has found a new home at the hawkish Hoover Institution, where he is researching the "ideology of terrorism."

Center for Security Policy
Founded by Frank Gaffney, the CSP has been one of the most vocal proponents of the "war on terror," using its privileged connections to military and government insiders to promote its vision of "peace through strength."

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

Diminished Religious Freedom in Iraq
By Khody Akhavi

Though the U.S. presence in Iraq is going on five years, Iraqis’ freedom to worship has diminished, according to a new State Department report. Read full story.

Who Killed Abu Risha?
By Jim Lobe

The Bush administration may have been too quick to pin blame on al-Qaida for the killing of Abu Risha, an important Sunni ally of the Iraqi government who had worked with U.S. authorities. Read full story.

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Featured Profiles

Haim Saban is a media mogul and major donor to the Democratic Party known for his hardline stance on Israel and opposition to the Iran nuclear deal.


Nikki Haley, Donald Trump’s first U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, is known for her lock-step support for Israel and is widely considered to be a future presidential candidate.


Brian Hook is the director of policy planning and senior policy advisor to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and is the head of the Iran Action Group.


Josh Rogin is a journalist known for his support for neoconservative policies and views.


Laurence Silberman, a senior justice on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, was a mentor to controversial Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and has been a vocal supporter of right-wing foreign and domestic agendas, including the campaign to support the invasion of Iraq.


The People’s Mujahedin of Iran, or MEK, advocates regime change in Iran and has strong connections with a wide range of top political figures in the U.S.


Eli Lake is a columnist for Bloomberg View who has a lengthy record of advocating for aggressive U.S. foreign policies towards the Middle East.


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From the Wires

The contradictions in Donald Trump’s foreign policy create opportunities for both rivals and long-standing (if irritated) US allies to challenge American influence. But Trump’s immediate priority is political survival, and his actions in the international arena are of little concern to his domestic supporters.


While the notion that criticism of Israel is anti-Semitic is decades old, it has been bolstered in recent years, by the campaign to add to the definition of anti-Semitism any criticism that singles Israel out and doesn’t apply the same standard to other countries. The bottom line is that this entire effort is designed not to combat anti-Semitism but to silence criticism. 


Short-term thinking, expedience, and a lack of strategic caution has led Washington to train, fund, and support group after group that have turned their guns on American soldiers and civilians.


Trump is not the problem. Think of him instead as a summons to address the real problem, which in a nation ostensibly of, by, and for the people is the collective responsibility of the people themselves. For Americans to shirk that responsibility further will almost surely pave the way for more Trumps — or someone worse — to come.


The United Nations has once again turn into a battleground between the United States and Iran, which are experiencing one of the darkest moments in their bilateral relations.


In many ways, Donald Trump’s bellicosity, his militarism, his hectoring cant about American exceptionalism and national greatness, his bullying of allies—all of it makes him not an opponent of neoconservatism but its apotheosis. Trump is a logical culmination of the Bush era as consolidated by Obama.


Soon after a Saudi-led coalition strike on a bus killed 40 children on August 9, a CENTCOM spokesperson stated to Vox, “We may never know if the munition [used] was one that the U.S. sold to them.”


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