Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

SPECIAL REPORT: An In-Depth Look at the Rise and Decline of an Influential Political Faction

The Rise and Decline of the Neoconservatives: A Right Web Special Report By Jim Lobe and Michael Flynn | November 17, 2006 Shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States, an influential neoconservative-led pressure group called the Project for the New American Century issued a letter to the president calling for a dramatic…

The Rise and Decline of the Neoconservatives:
A Right Web Special Report
By Jim Lobe and Michael Flynn | November 17, 2006

Shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States, an influential neoconservative-led pressure group called the Project for the New American Century issued a letter to the president calling for a dramatic reshaping of the Middle East as part of the war on terror. Although many of the items on the neoconservatives’ agenda, including ousting Saddam Hussein, were eventually adopted by the George W. Bush administration, the group’s remarkable string of successes has gradually given way to a steady decline, culminating most recently in the president’s decision after the November midterm elections to replace Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, an important erstwhile ally of the neocons, with Robert Gates. This special, in-depth report examines the rise and decline of the neoconservatives and their post-Cold War agenda. The authors conclude that although the neoconservatives and their allied aggressive nationalists like Vice President Dick Cheney retain sufficient weight to hamper efforts to push through major reversals in U.S. foreign policy, the increasing isolation of this political faction coupled with recent political events in the United States point to the potential emergence of a more cautious, realist-inspired agenda during the final two years of the Bush presidency. Read full report.

Rumors of a Neocon Death Are Highly Exaggerated
By Leon Hadar | November 15, 2006

It’s a new day dawning for neoconservatives. Yesterday’s power players and today’s apparent losers, the ideological band of brothers is making a desperate attempt to stay on top, as evidenced by their efforts to blame everyone but themselves. Read full story.

ALSO NEW THIS WEEK ON RIGHT WEB

Changing of the Guard
By Jim Lobe | November 13, 2006

The abrupt replacement of Pentagon chief Donald Rumsfeld by former Central Intelligence Agency Director Robert Gates, combined with the Democratic sweep in last Tuesday’s midterm elections, appears to signal major changes in U.S. foreign policy, particularly in the Middle East. Read full story.

Right Web Profile: Donald Rumsfeld

Rumsfeld, who steered the United States to war with Iraq, is leaving his helm at the Pentagon under a cloud of public criticism.

ODDS AND ENDS

In this week’s Right Web News, Leon Hadar, a scholar based at the Cato Institute, argues (in

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Featured Profiles

The brainchild of Sears-Roebuck heiress Nina Rosenwald, the Gatestone Institute is a New York-based advocacy organization formerly chaired by John Bolton that is notorious for spreading misinformation about Muslims and advocating extremely hawkish views on everything from Middle East policy to immigration.


Conrad Black is a former media mogul closely connected to rightist political factions in the United States who was convicted in July 2007 for fraud and obstruction of justice and later pardoned by his friend President Trump.


David Friedman is U.S. Ambassador to Israel under Donald Trump. He is known for his extreme views on Israel, which include opposition to the creation of a Palestinian state and support for Israeli settlements.


Jason Greenblatt is the Special Representative for International Negotiations for President Donald Trump primarily working on the Israel-Palestine conflict.


The neoconservative Foundation for Defense of Democracies has re-established itself as a primary driver of hawkish foreign policy, especially in the Middle East, during the Trump administration.


Rupert Murdoch is the head of News Corp, the parent company of Fox News, and a long-time supporter of neoconservative campaigns to influence U.S. foreign policy.


Shmuley Boteach is a “celebrity rabbi” known for his controversial “pro-Israel” advocacy.


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From the Wires

A series of escalations in both word and deed have raised fears of U.S.-Iranian military confrontation, either direct or by proxy. It is urgent that cooler heads prevail – in European capitals as in Tehran and Washington – to head off the threat of a disastrous war.


Vladimir Putin excels at taking advantage of mistakes made by Russia’s adversaries to further his country’s interests. Donald Trump’s Iran policy has given Putin plenty of opportunity to do that.


The Trump administration’s claims about purported Iranian threats have been repeated by credulous reporters and TV news programs far and wide.


This is the cartoon that the international edition of the New York Times should have run, at least as regards U.S. policy toward Iran.


The assault on Tripoli by Khalifa Haftar, Libya’s renegade general and leader of the self-anointed Libyan National Army (LNA), has forced an indefinite postponement of key UN peace efforts in the country even as the Trump White House announced that the president recognized Haftar’s “important” role in fighting terrorists.


With all eyes focused these days on Donald Trump and his myriad crimes, John Bolton’s speeches are a reminder that even worse options are waiting in the wings.


Advocates of cutting U.S. aid to Israel rather than using it as leverage must understand how this aid works, how big a challenge it represents for advocacy, and how to make a potentially successful argument against it.


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