Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Special NATO Issue

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Contents

This Week on the Right | Tom Barry
What’s New | U.S. Committee on NATO, Project on Transitional Democracies, New Atlantic Initiative, Daniel Pipes,Middle East Forum
Letters and Feedback | Africa, Shameful

This Week on the Right

NATO Expansion
By Tom Barry

The cold war is long over, but with the support of U.S. supremacists in both parties NATO lives on as America’s global cop.

Russia is concerned that there is another cold war brewing, as NATO plans to station fighter planes in the Baltic republics. In the Duma, Russian deputies expressed concern last week that U.S. F-16s will be patrolling the Russian border and permanently stationed just 160 kilometers from St. Petersburg.

Seven more nations joined NATO last week, three more former Soviet bloc nations have their applications pending. Although the Bush administration has set an overall course in foreign and military policy of treaty-breaking and unilateralism, it remains a strong proponent of NATO expansion.

But while the Russians are grimacing, the neoconservatives and U.S. military contractors are smiling. The expanded NATO represents an expanded market for Lockheed and other military contractors, and the new NATO countries are likely members of future “coalitions of the willing” assembled by the U.S. government. Bruce Jackson, who founded the U.S. Committee on NATO and sits on the board of directors of the Project for the New American Century, is widely credited for having spearheaded the two recent expansions of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

A feature article in EuroMoney last year offered an illuminating portrait of Jackson, whose father, William Harding Jackson was deputy director of the CIA in the 1950s and who himself worked in Defense Department intelligence under Richard Perle in the 1980s. According to EuroMoney’s reporter Julian Evans:

“Speaking to Jackson gives one a fascinating insight into the neoconservative mentality–indeed, he might be described as Europe’s neoconservative, bringing regime change (or at least reform) wherever he goes. It is, whatever you think of it, a revolutionary mentality, and one driven by a prodigious energy. He says Europe is now in a ‘revolutionary period,’ as significant a period since the treaty of Westphalia in 1648 and adds: ‘Where Europe finds itself in five years will be where Europe stands for the next 50 years.’ Like many neoconservatives inspired by Ronald Reagan’s strong moral rhetoric, morality is very much at the centre of Jackson’s vision. He quotes Pope John Paul II to declare that the revolutions of 1989 were not political but moral. He’s also a highly committed supporter of Israel, like most neoconservatives, and an opponent of anti-semitism wherever he sees it or thinks he sees it.

“And like others in Bush’s government, there is an almost millenarian tinge to some of his language–he says Europe is now entering its ‘third and final phase.’ He is nothing if not grand in his thinking. He says Europe must incorporate its neighbors to the east because ‘a greater Europe sets the stage for the two great endeavors of 21st-century democracy–the democratization and integration of Russia, and the democratization and liberalization of the Greater Middle East’.”

Jackson, a former investment banker and until 2002 vice president for strategy and planning at Lockheed, must be heartened by the new weapons deals being signed by the new NATO members. EuroMoney described Poland’s March 2003 acquisition of 48 F-16s as “the biggest debt financing of the year–a $5.5 billion off-balance-sheet deal arranged by JPMorgan and guaranteed by the U.S. government.”

EuroMoney spoke to a banker involved in the syndication of the financing. "We understood what the deal was," he said. "The U.S. government finances the deal at good rates. In return, Poland supports the U.S. in Iraq."

Euromoney rhetorically asked: “Is he [Jackson] the military-industrial complex conspiracy figure par excellence?”

(Tom Barry is Policy Director of the Interhemispheric Resource Center (IRC), online at: www.irc-online.org.)

For more on the neocons and NATO, see:

Julian Evans, “The Man Who Brought NATO East,” EuroMoney, December 2003
http://www.projecttransitionaldemocracy.org/html/Press/PTD_euromoney.htm

Tom Barry, “Long Live NATO,” Right Web Analysis, IRC, April 1, 2004
https://rightweb.irc-online.org/analysis/2004/0404nato.php

“Bruce Jackson,” Right Web Profile, IRC, March 2004
https://rightweb.irc-online.org/ind/jackson/jackson.php

What’s New on Right Web

Featured Profiles

Neocon’s NATO Lobby. Among first board members of the U.S. Committee on NATO were Paul Wolfowitz, Richard Perle, and Stephen Hadley. Hadley, who serves in the Bush administration as deputy national security adviser to Condoleezza Rice, was a partner in the Shea & Gardner law firm, whose clients included Boeing and Lockheed Martin. More recent board members include Randy Scheunemann, Julie Finley, and Gary Schmitt, who are also tangled with three other organizations: the Project on Transitional Democracies, the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq, and the Project for the New American Century. Randy Scheunemann, a board member of the Project for the New American Century, was also another link to Lockheed Martin, since he was president of Orion Strategies, whose clients include the largest defense contractor in the United States.

Right Web Profile: U.S. Committee on NATO
https://rightweb.irc-online.org/org/uscnato.php

Related Profiles: Bruce Jackson, Julie Finley, Randy Scheunemann, Committee for the Liberation of Iraq

Transitioning to the U.S. Orbit. The Project on Transitional Democracies is a spin-off of the U.S. Committee on NATO, which closed its doors in late 2003. However, the offices of the NATO committee, which was founded in 1996 by Bruce Jackson, now serve as the offices of the Project on Transitional Democracies. All three principals of the Project on Transitional Democracies have worked for the Republican Party, and Jackson and Scheunemann have close ties with major military contractors, notably Lockheed Martin.

Right Web Profile: Project on Transitional Democracies
https://rightweb.irc-online.org/org/ptd.php

Atlanticism from American Enterprise Institute. Henry Kissinger is the chairman of an international advisory board of the New Atlantic Initiative, which is heavily weighted with neoconservatives, neoliberal ideologues, and European rightists. Bruce Jackson of the Project for Transitional Democracies and the now-defunct U.S. Committee on NATO was a founding member of the New Atlantic Initiative.

Right Web Profile: New Atlantic Initiative
https://rightweb.irc-online.org/org/nai.php

What’s Academic Freedom Got to Do with It? A band of neoconservative pundits with close ties to Israel have mounted a campaign against American scholars who study the Middle East. Martin Kramer, an Israeli-American and former director of the Dayan Center for Middle East Studies at Tel-Aviv University, has led the way in blaming these scholars for failing to warn the American public about the dangers of radical Islam, claiming they bear some of the responsibility for what befell us on September 11. In 2003, proponents of this position took their complaints to Congress. The Senate is expected to review them soon, as it discusses the Higher Education Reauthorization bill. Joel Beinen examines the campaign by groups such as the Middle East Forum to control Middle East Studies.

Right Web Analysis: Thought Control for Middle East Studies by Joel Beinen

Related Profiles: Daniel Pipes, Middle East Forum

One Treaty the Bush Administration Supports. At a time when it appears that the U.S. is becoming increasingly isolated, the Bush administration is exercising strong leadership over what the president describes as the “most successful military alliance in history.” The Bush administration has lashed out at European critics of its neo-imperial policies and dismissed the dissident Western European nations as representatives of the “old Europe,” but it rests secure in the knowledge that U.S. military leadership and America’s military dominance are central to NATO and that NATO is the centerpiece of transatlantic relations. Given that most European nations lack strong militaries of their own and that EU still lacks a unified security infrastructure, the ever-expanding NATO operating under U.S. direction will likely remain an effective instrument of U.S. hegemony, not only in North Atlantic but also from the Gulf of Finland to the Black Sea, and from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf.

Right Web Analysis: Long Live NATO by Tom Barry

Letters and Feedback

(Please send your comments to rightweb@irc-online.org )

Africa Ignored

(Letter sent to the IRC’s Progressive Response ezine in response to Right Web analysis.)

Tom Barry’s piece titled "One Year After the Invasion: Bagdad and Beyond" made an interesting read. But he chose to ignore the peril which the neocon global dream of empire poses to African countries. It is no secret that part of the global strategy of the Bush administration is a gradual reduction of American dependence on Arab oil, and an increasing dependence on the Gulf of Guinea. Already U.S. is making the same mistake it made in Iran under the Shah, by assisting the Nigerian government in an arms build-up, as well as positioning it as the policeman of the subregion.

As this policy continues to unfold, the hidden danger is that it may also lead to a transfer of the Arab terrorism focus from the Middle East to the Gulf of Guinea region.

– Uchegbu Karl Chinedu

Chinedu is a Military Affairs Analyst with the African Institute for Strategic Studies, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

See Right Web Analysis: The Evangelical Roots of American Unilateralism: The Christian Right’s Influence and How to Counter It

Barry responds: Mr. Chinedu points out some of the problems of a misdirected U.S. foreign policy in Africa, which certainly deserve exposure. However, I believe it a mistake to identify these as the offshoots of a policy agenda that is specifically of neoconservative origin.

Shameful

This is a shameful site that attempts to shame people whose ideas you disagree with. If you disagree with people then find a way of arguing with them on those ideas, but this is ugly. Talk about McCarthyism.

– “Another Right Wing Bigot”

Looking for a way to start untangling the web of power
spun by right-wing organizations and ideologues?

The IRC’s Right Web program is struggling to survive on an unsustainable budget—which is half of the average salary of a single “resident scholar” at one of the right’s think tanks. Since its launch in December 2003 Right Web has received $1,150 in online contributions. Thank you. By the end of 2004, we need to count on continuing donations to meet our fundraising goal of $33,500.

Consider signing up to be a paid subscriber of Right Web News. At the bargain-basement rate of $15 a year, your subscription will enable us to publish this innovative new IRC ezine on a regular and timely basis. On the other hand, without donations or subscriptions from readers like you Right Web will be a short-lived project.

Also consider becoming an IRC member (memberships start at $35). You can do this by going to: https://secure.iexposure.com/irc/donate.cfm. Make a secure online contribution, or print out the form and mail us a donation by credit card or check. Or call us at 505-388-0208. Thank you.

If you would like to see our variety of free ezines and listservs, please go to: http://www.irc-online.org/lists/.
To be removed from this list, please email rightweb@irc-online.org with “unsubscribe Right Web.”

Share RightWeb

Featured Profiles

Vin Weber, a former Republican congressman and longtime “superlobbyist” who has supported numerous neoconservative advocacy campaigns, has become embroiled in the special prosecutor’s investigation into the Donald Trump campaign’s potential collusion with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.


Jon Lerner is a conservative political strategist and top adviser to US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley. He was a key figure in the “Never Trump” Campaign, which appears to have led to his being ousted as Vice President Mike Pence’s national security adviser.


Pamela Geller is a controversial anti-Islam activist who has founded several “hate groups” and likes to repeat debunked myths, including about the alleged existence of “no-go” Muslim zones in Europe.


Max Boot, neoconservative military historian at the Council on Foreign Relations, on Trump and Russia: “At every turn Trump is undercutting the ‘get tough on Russia’ message because he just can’t help himself, he just loves Putin too much.”


Although overlooked by President Trump for cabinet post, Gingrich has tried to shape affairs in the administration, including by conspiring with government officials to “purge the State Department of staffers they viewed as insufficiently loyal” to the president.


Former Sen Mark Kirk (R-IL) is an advisor for United Against Nuclear Iran. He is an outspoken advocate for aggressive action against Iran and a fierce defender of right-wing Israeli policies.


A military historian, Kimberly Kagan heads the Institute for the Study of War, where she has promoted the continuation of U.S. war in Afghanistan.


For media inquiries,
email rightwebproject@gmail.com

From the Wires

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Other than the cynical political interests in Moscow and Tehran, there is no conceivable rationale for wanting Bashar al-Assad to stay in power. But the simple fact is, he has won the war. And while Donald Trump has reveled in positive press coverage of the recent attacks on the country, it is clear that they were little more than a symbolic act.


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The reality is that the Assad regime is winning the Syrian civil war, and this matters far less to U.S. interests than it does to that regime or its allies in Russia and Iran, who see Syria as their strongest and most consistent entrée into the Arab world. Those incontrovertible facts undermine any notion of using U.S. military force as leverage to gain a better deal for the Syrian people.


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

An effective rhetorical tool to normalize military build-ups is to characterize spending increases “modernization.”


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The Pentagon has officially announced that that “long war” against terrorism is drawing to a close — even as many counterinsurgency conflicts  rage across the Greater Middle East — and a new long war has begun, a permanent campaign to contain China and Russia in Eurasia.


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Revelations that data-consulting firm Cambridge Analytica used ill-gotten personal information from Facebook for the Trump campaign masks the more scandalous reality that the company is firmly ensconced in the U.S. military-industrial complex. It should come as no surprise then that the scandal has been linked to Erik Prince, co-founder of Blackwater.


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

As the United States enters the second spring of the Trump era, it’s creeping ever closer to more war. McMaster and Mattis may have written the National Defense Strategy that over-hyped the threats on this planet, but Bolton and Pompeo will have the opportunity to address these inflated threats in the worst way possible: by force of arms.


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

We meet Donald Trump in the media every hour of every day, which blots out much of the rest of the world and much of what’s meaningful in it.  Such largely unexamined, never-ending coverage of his doings represents a triumph of the first order both for him and for an American cult of personality.


RightWeb
share