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Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

The Right Gets Feverish over Siberia; Profiles on Andrew C. McCarthy, J. Michael Waller, and more

Right Web is now on Facebook. Become a fan! Available online at: http://www.rightweb.irc-online.org/articles/category/right_web_news Right Web is a project of the Institute for Policy Studies   FEATURED ARTICLES Whose Siberia? By Alec Dubro Siberia’s forbidden hinterlands have long been a source of friction between Russia and China. In recent years, however, the idea that a horde…

Right Web is now on Facebook. Become a fan!

Available online at: http://www.rightweb.irc-online.org/articles/category/right_web_news

Right Web is a project of the Institute for Policy Studies

 

FEATURED ARTICLES

Whose Siberia?

By Alec Dubro

Siberia’s forbidden hinterlands have long been a source of friction between Russia and China. In recent years, however, the idea that a horde of Asian invaders stands ready to reclaim this land for the Middle Kingdom has inspired the fevered minds of both right-wing Americans and Russian nationalists. Nevertheless, tensions along the eastern Siberian frontier are just that—tensions. And there is nothing to indicate that Beijing sees a suicidal invasion as preferable to simply buying Siberian resources, and letting the Russians live with isolation, cold, and summer mosquitoes. But then again, conspiratorial minds will always discount the likely explanation in favor of an apocalyptic one. Read full article .

 

FEATURED PROFILES

Andrew C. McCarthy

The National Review writer and former federal prosecutor thinks that all “Islamists,” both peaceful and violent, intend to overthrow the U.S. government.

J. Michael Waller

Waller, a neoconservative academic at the Institute of World Politics, uses his blogs to hype purported threats about sharia law and to promote the argument that the United States should “snatch” the founder of WikiLeaks and pursue espionage charges against him.

American Security Council

Once described as the “heart and soul of the military-industrial complex,” the American Security Council was an influential old-guard conservative group during the early Cold War whose coalition-building efforts prefigured the work of neoconservative groups like the Project for the New American Century.

Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs

An academic center of the American conservative movement, the Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs has been a vigorous defender of the war on terrorism and an unequivocal supporter of militarist Israeli policies.

Institute of World Politics

The Institute of World Politics is a Washington, D.C.-based graduate school closely tied to right-wing networks in the United States.

 

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US Military Aid Far Outpaces Democracy Assistance in Central Asia

To service the war in Afghanistan, the Obama administration has provided six times more on military aid for the mostly authoritarian states of Central Asia than on efforts to promote political liberalization and human rights.

US Jews Increasingly Hawkish on Iran, Sceptical of Obama

American Jewish support of President Obama's performance may be on the wane while their attitudes towards Iran may be growing more hawkish, according to a recent poll conducted by the American Jewish Committee of 800 self-identified Jews.

Nine Years in, Afghans Don’t Trust US

A new independent report calls into doubt whether recent U.S. moves aimed at reducing civilian casualties in Afghanistan have succeeded in overcoming the population’s perception of Western indifference and malevolence.

Will Renewed US-China Military Ties Relax Regional Tensions?

A month-long effort to restore military-to-military ties between Washington and Beijing seems to have paid off as Pentagon chief Robert Gates is set to meet with his Chinese counterpart, Gen. Liang Guanglie, in Vietnam this week.

Senate Urges Pentagon to Rein in Afghan Contractors

According to a recent Senate Armed Services Committee report, failures in vetting, training, and supervising private security contractors are putting coalition troops and Afghan civilians at risk.

 

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