Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

U.S. Committee on NATO

Please note: IPS Right Web neither represents nor endorses any of the individuals or groups profiled on this site.

The U.S. Committee on NATO, a rightist advocacy organization committed to increasing U.S. influence through expansion of the transatlantic military alliance, was originally founded in the mid-1990s as the U.S. Committee to Expand NATO. Its founders, Bruce Jackson and Greg Craig, later renamed the group the U.S. Committee on NATO (USCN). The committee’s motto was “Strengthen America. Secure Europe. Defend Values. Expand NATO.”[1] It ceased operations in 2003.

Following the group’s termination, Jackson and two other principals of the committee—Randy Scheunemann and Julie Finley—used the committee’s office space to found a successor group, the Project on Transitional Democracies.

Among USCN’s initial board members were two high-profile neoconservative figures, Paul Wolfowitz and Richard Perle. Other board members included Stephen Hadley, who served in the George W. Bush administration as deputy national security adviser to Condoleezza Rice; Randy Scheunemann, later a key aide to Sen. John McCain and Sarah Palin; Julie Finley, a Republican Party operative and founding member of the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq; and Gary Schmitt, a former director of the Project for the New American Century and scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.[2]

The committee was well placed to service the needs of a number of factions, including both hawkish ideologues and the defense industry. NATO expansion requires integrating national militaries, a process that opens up lucrative weapons markets, including jet fighters, electronics, attack helicopters, communication networks, among other trappings of modern military forces. “Add them together,” Joel Johnson, vice president of the Aerospace Industries Association, told the New York Times, “and we’re talking about real money.”[3]

Until 2002 Bruce Jackson was planning and strategy vice president at Lockheed Martin, where he served as the advance man for global corporate development projects.[4] One prominent neocon described Jackson as “the nexus between the defense industry and the neoconservatives. He translates us to them, and them to us.”[5]

In the estimation of John Laughland, a trustee of the British Helsinki Human Rights Group and a close observer of Jackson's work in Eastern Europe: “Far from promoting democracy in eastern Europe, Washington is promoting a system of political and military control not unlike the once practiced by the Soviet Union. Unlike that empire, which collapsed because the center was weaker than the periphery, the new NATO is both a mechanism for extracting Danegeld [tribute levied to support Danish invaders in medieval England] from new member states for the benefit of the U.S. arms industry and an instrument for getting others to protect U.S. interests around the world, including the supply of primary resources such as oil.”[6]

In the lead-up to the U.S. invasion of Iraq, Jackson helped draft the declaration by the Vilnius Ten governments supporting the planned U.S. invasion with or without UN approval. Eager for U.S. support for their entry into NATO, the countries of what Donald Rumsfeld called the “New Europe” joined the war coalition, at least in name. Slovenia later backed away from the statement after revelations that its foreign minister “had buckled…under Bruce Jackson’s threat.”[7]

The U.S. Committee on NATO and the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq, both of which were organized by Jackson, were disbanded in late 2003, apparently because its members believed that they had accomplished their mission.[8]

Funding

The U.S. Committee on NATO did not offer any information about funding sources on its now-defunct website. According to Bruce Jackson, “I finance myself, with money I made from investment banking [he was chief strategist on the proprietary trading desk at Lehman Brothers from 1990 to 1993]. It's not as if it's some individual project though. A lot of people volunteer their time for the NGO. Volunteer work is much more normal in Washington than in Europe."[9]

Share RightWeb

Please note: IPS Right Web neither represents nor endorses any of the individuals or groups profiled on this site.

Sources

[1] Jeff Gerth and Tim Weiner, “Arms Makers See Bonanza in Selling NATO Expansion,” New York Times, June 28, 1997; J.J. Richardson, “Going For Broke--or Just Broke?” MoJo Wire, Mother Jones Magazine.

[2] Jeff Gerth and Tim Weiner, “Arms Makers See Bonanza in Selling NATO Expansion,” New York Times, June 28, 1997; John B. Judis, “Minister Without Portfolio,” The American Prospect, May 2003, http://www.prospect.org/cs/articles?article=minister_without_portfolio; Stephen Gowans, “War, NATO expansion, and the other rackets of Bruce P. Jackson,” What’s Left, November 25, 2002, http://www3.sympatico.ca/sr.gowans/jackson.html.

[3] Jeff Gerth and Tim Weiner, "Arms Makers See Bonanza in Selling NATO Expansion," New York Times, June 28, 1997.

[4] Jeff Gerth and Tim Weiner, “Arms Makers See Bonanza in Selling NATO Expansion,” New York Times, June 28, 1997

[5] John B. Judis, “Minister Without Portfolio,” The American Prospect, May 2003, http://www.prospect.org/cs/articles?article=minister_without_portfolio.

[6] John Laughland, “The Prague racket: Nato is now a device to exert control and extract cash. Those who resist, like Belarus, are punished,” The Guardian, November 22, 2002, http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,845129,00.html

[7] John B. Judis, “Minister Without Portfolio,” The American Prospect, May 2003, http://www.prospect.org/print/V14/5/judis-j.html; John Laughland, “The Prague racket: Nato is now a device to exert control and extract cash. Those who resist, like Belarus, are punished,” The Guardian, November 22, 2002, http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,845129,00.html.

[8] Jim Lobe, "Committee for the Liberation of Iraq" Sets Up Shop,” Foreign Policy in Focus Policy Report, November 2002

[9] Julian Evans, “The Man Who Brought NATO East,” Euromoney, December 2003.

Share RightWeb

U.S. Committee on NATO Résumé

Motto

“Strengthen America. Secure Europe. Defend Values. Expand NATO.”


Founded

1996


Disbanded

2003


Former Principals

  • Bruce Jackson, Co-Founder
  • Greg Craig, Co-Founder
  • Julie Finley, Board of Directors
  • Stephen Hadley, Board of Directors
  • Richard Perle, Board of Directors
  • Randy Scheunemann, Board of Directors
  • Paul Wolfowitz, Board of Directors

Related:

U.S. Committee on NATO News Feed

Livestream: 'NATO Engages: The Alliance at 70' - Defense OneAs NATO ministers gather in Washington, US rift with Turkey widens - Washington ExaminerNATO Military Committee visit Georgia in show of continued support - NATO HQAs It Turns 70, Is NATO Still Necessary? - NPRUS Turkey ambassador nominee vows to demand human rights progress, NATO commitments - AhvalU.S. pauses Turkey's participation in F-35 program - PoliticoDemocrats unveil two-year budget proposal - PoliticoKay Bailey Hutchison reflects on rewarding NATO post - Austin American-StatesmanNATO Is Not Dying. It's a Zombie. - The National Interest OnlinePower Up: NATO comes to Trump's Town - The Washington PostA brief history of NATO, from Truman to Trump - Brookings InstitutionCommittee calls on Canada to co-operate with NATO to respond to Russia in Arctic - Coast Mountain NewsWho is to blame for Turkey-US strife? - Daily SabahShowdown of world powers in Venezuela enters dangerous, new phase - CNBCEverything you need to know about NATO as it turns 70 this week - We Are The MightyU.S. congressional committee leaders warn Turkey on F-35, S-400 - KFGO NewsComedian Headed for Landslide Victory in Ukraine - U.S. News & World ReportDon't Tell Russia: U.S. Forces in Europe Lack Firepower - The National Interest OnlineAfghanistan, the forever war that was basically won in a few months - Washington ExaminerTimeline of US-Russia Relations (1983-March 2019) - Russia Matters

Right Web is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

The Right Web Mission

Right Web tracks militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy.

For media inquiries,
email rightwebproject@gmail.com

From the Wires

The new government will, once again, be the most right wing in Israel’s history. But this time, the length of the new government’s tenure will depend more on Netanyahu’s legal troubles than on the political dynamics of the coalition.


Given such a dismal U.S. record on non-proliferation, why should North Korea trust U.S. promises of future sanctions relief and security guarantees in exchange for denuclearization? If anything, the case of the JCPOA has demonstrated that regardless of its pledges the United States can reinstate sanctions and even bully private multinational companies to divest from Iran.


As Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, National Security Advisor John Bolton, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and Saudi crown prince and de facto ruler Mohammad bin Salman clamor for a war against Iran, they seem to have conveniently forgotten the destruction and mayhem wrought by the American invasion of Iraq 16 years ago.


President Trump’s announcement that he would recognise Israeli sovereignty over the western part of the Golan Heights destroys the negotiating basis for any future peace between Israel and Syria. It also lays the groundwork for a return to a world without territorial integrity for smaller, weaker countries.


The Senate on Wednesday passed a measure mandating the withdrawal of U.S. forces from the Saudi/UAE-led war against Houthi rebels in Yemen. The vote marks the first time since the War Powers Act of 1973 became law that both chambers of Congress have directed the president to withdraw American forces from a conflict.


The Trump administration’s failed “maximum pressure” approach to Iran and North Korea begs the question what the US president’s true objectives are and what options he is left with should the policy ultimately fail.


In the United States, it’s possible to debate any and every policy, domestic and foreign, except for unquestioning support for Israel. That, apparently, is Ilhan Omar’s chief sin.


RightWeb
share