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Foster Panel

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About The so-called Foster Panel–after its head, John S. Foster, Jr.–was established at the urging of Sen. Jon Kyl by the fiscal year 1999 Defense Authorization Act to report on the safety and reliability of the country’s nuclear weapons stockpile. As head of the panel, formally known as the Panel to Assess the Reliability, Safety, and Security of the U.S. Nuclear Stockpile, Foster, a foreign policy hawk, has been instrumental in pushing for new nuclear weapons development and testing.

According to a report in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, "Congressional advocates of nuclear testing and new weapons production have not been particularly subtle. Consider the ‘Panel to Assess the Reliability, Safety, and Security of the United States Nuclear Stockpile.’ … In its second and most recent report, released in February, the panel recommends, among other things, spending $4 billion to $6 billion over the next decade to ‘restore needed production capabilities … to meet both current and future workloads’; to construct a small-scale plutonium pit production facility at Los Alamos; to continue design work on new warheads; and to shorten the time needed to prepare for tests at the Nevada Test Site from 24 to 36 months to just three to four months. The Energy Department is reported to be working now on increased preparedness for testing."

Foster, a former member of the Committee on the Present Danger and an instrumental figure in the establishment of the Team B exercise in the late 1970s, is a longtime player in the U.S. military-industrial complex. He is an advisor or board member for several defense contractors, including Arete, Jaycor, United Technologies, and Pilkington Aerospace. (2)

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Sources

(1) "Foster Panel Calls for Reducing Nuclear Test Preparation Time," Arms Control Today, April 2002
http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2002_04/fosterapril02.asp

(2) Right Web: John S. Foster, Jr.
https://rightweb.irc-online.org/ind/foster/foster.html

(3) Stephen Schwartz, "The New-Nuke Chorus Tunes Up," Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, July/August 2001
http://www.thebulletin.org/issues/2001/ja01/ja01schwartz.html

(4) House Armed Services Committee: Testimony of John S. Foster, March 21, 2002

http://web.archive.org/web/20030211054419/http://www.house.gov/hasc/openingstatementsandpressreleases/
107thcongress/02-03-21foster.html

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Foster Panel Résumé

Right Web connections

  • Harold Agnew, member
  • John S. Foster, Jr., chair
  • Jon Kyl, congressional proponent
  • James Schlesinger, member


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    Foster Panel News Feed

    Tim Cook, Ginni Rometty Join White House Panel on A.I. and Workforce Automation - FortuneWe foster carers are unsupported, unappreciated and undervalued - The GuardianArizona fights class-action status for lawsuit over foster-care issues - AZCentralHouse panel: Private school 'equality' trumps county authority - County 1720000 Children in Need: State nonprofit offers insights to foster care at Prescott event - The Daily CourierFoster To Hold Discussion To Confront Opioid Epidemic - Patch.comRookies lead the way on House science panel - Science MagazineSouth Carolina foster care group can reject gays, Jews. What does it mean for Philly? - Philly.comWhite House grants S.C. foster care group waiver to deny gays, Jews - Tribune-ReviewWV MetroNews Foster care bill amendment stirs House division, debate - West Virginia MetroNewsMY VOICE: Children in foster care need your help; - La Grande ObserverBCDSS Foster Care Partners with Baltimore's 'Uplifting Minds II' Entertainment Conference - Eurweb.comVikings Involved in 'Hate is Wrong' Inclusion Panel - Vikings.comWhat Will It Take for US Latinos to Thrive in Hollywood? - RemezclaAt Penn Dems panel, speakers discuss controversy surrounding Women's March - The Daily PennsylvanianLawmakers hear bills to change child protection system - Great Falls TribunePanel advises city to consider moving school security from NYPD to DOE - New York Post Annenberg hosts panel on female representation in music - Daily Trojan OnlineSenate panel advances Trump's pick for key IRS role | TheHill - The HillPanel would try to determine why kids run away - Great Falls Tribune

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