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Benador Public Relations

Please note: IPS Right Web neither represents nor endorses any of the individuals or groups profiled on this site.

Benador Public Relations (BPR) is the successor company to Benador Associates, a speakers bureau and PR firm founded by Eleana Benador that played a key role promoting major neoconservative figures during the first George W. Bush administration.

In contrast to Benador Associates, BPR endeavors to avoid controversial political issues. According to its website, “This boutique public relations firm is particularly targeting high end clients worldwide whose activities and interests need the expertise of a professional who understands the sensitivities, needs and expectations of their counterparts in other parts of the world. … Whether you need public relations support or, like in the case of banking institutions, privately enhance your customer relations or develop your activities in another country or continent, and whether you specialize in finance, real estate, industries, the arts, architecture, fashion, health, or others, the reality is that you need someone who truly understands where you are coming from, what your target is and who is committed enough to understand also your partners and serves as your ‘diplomatic representative’ to make you succeed in whatever your goal is.”[1]

Benador announced the launching of BPR in 2007, saying that its “areas of expertise—with absolute exclusion of politics—will include: international finance, with investment banking and infrastructure projects as the main chapters in that field; international real estate; science and culture.” According to a BPR statement, "Ms. Benador announced that in view of the uncertain political situation in America, she is to devote her undivided attention to her new public relations outfit.”[2]

The now-defunct Benador Associates included among its clientele several high profile foreign policy hawks, including Frank Gaffney of the Center for Security Policy, Richard Perle, Michael Ledeen, Michael Rubin, and former CIA director James Woolsey, Max Boot, Rachel Ehrenfeld, Hillel Fradkin, Charles Krauthammer, Richard Pipes, Dennis Prager, Paul Vallely, and Meyrav Wurmser.

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Please note: IPS Right Web neither represents nor endorses any of the individuals or groups profiled on this site.

Sources

[1]Benador Public Relations, “About,” http://www.benadorpr.com/aboutus.html.

[2]Benador Public Relations, "Announcing the Creation of Benador Public Relations,”November 29, 2007, http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/announcing-the-creation-of-benador-public-relations-59898872.html


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Contact Information

Benador Public Relations
Phone: 212-717-9966
Mobile: 917-626-1266
Email: eb@benadorpr.com
Website: http://www.benadorpr.com/

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Right Web tracks militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy.

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