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Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs

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Based at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio, the Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs was founded in honor of John M. Ashbrook, a former Ohio Congressman. In accordance with Ashbrook’s philosophy—he famously criticized President Richard Nixon for having “turned left”—the Ashbrook Center advocates “limited constitutional government and reduced federal spending.”[1] A consistent supporter of conservative social policies, neo-classical economics, and an aggressive militant foreign policy, the center has attracted a number of high profile right-wing figures to its lectures and seminars, including Karl Rove, Dick Cheney, and Glenn Beck, among others.

The Ashbrook Center undertakes a number of activities. The Ashbrook Scholars Program familiarizes Ashland University students with conservative policies through face-to-face meetings with prominent rightist political figures.[2] It also provides them with internships at allied organizations including the Heritage Foundation, the Republican National Committee, and Fox News. Ashbrook’s many publications, including the student-run Res Publica, often advocate aggressive “war on terror” policies, continued military support to Israel, and increased nuclear capabilities. [3]

Ashbrook formerly operated a blog titled No Left Turns, which covered everything from religion to foreign affairs. The blog was often used to promote military interventions and other controversial policies associated with the war on terror, including the Afghan and Iraq Wars, rendition, torture, and targeted assassination campaigns. In its later years, the focus shifted to a steady denouncement of the Barack Obama administration’s policies, and general support for Tea Party platforms and leaders.[4]

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Sources

[1] Ashbrook Center, “About the Ashbrook Center,” http://www.ashbrook.org/about

[2] Ashland University, “Ashbrook Scholar Program.” http://scholar.ashland.edu

[3] Ashbrook Center, “Res Publica,” http://www.ashbrook.org/publicat/respub/

[4] Ashbrook Center, “No Left Turns,” http://nlt.ashbrook.org

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Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs Résumé

CONTACT INFORMATION

Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs
Ashland University
401 College Avenue
Ashland, Ohio 44805
Phone: 877-289-5411
Website: http://www.ashbrook.org

 

FOUNDED
1983

 

BOARD OF ADVISORS (as of 2017)
Marvin J. Krinsky
Robert D. Alt
William G. Batchelder
J. Kenneth Blackwell
James Buchenwald
David M. Bush
David L. Carto
David J. Eichinger
D. Rex Elsass
Frederick Finks
Christopher Flannery
Jeffrey S. Gorman
Bill Harris
Steven F. Hayward
Charles F. Hayward
Charles R. Kesler
Robert D. Kessler
William Kristol
Douglas R. Kurkul
Richard Lowry
Nancy Van Meter Matia
Matt Miller
Joseph Robertson, IV
Peter W. Schramm
Rick Segal
Paula Steiner
David Tucker
Thomas B. Whatman
Christopher L. White

FORMER GUEST LECTURERS
William Voegeli
Jonah Goldberg
Robert Alt
Mitt Romney
John Kasich
Steven Hayward
Jeb Bush
Glenn Beck
Karl Rove
James McPherson
David Hackett Fischer
William Bennett
Edwin Meese
Barbara Bush
Benjamin Netanyahu
Clarence Thomas
Margaret Thatcher
Dick Cheney
Ronald Reagan

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The Right Web Mission

Right Web tracks militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy.

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