Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Israeli Hawks Downplay Iranian Nukes; the New Arc of Crisis; Stifling Dissent; FreedomWorks; Emanuel

FEATURED ARTICLE

Look Who’s Downplaying Iran’s Nuclear Threat
By Leon Hadar

In a series of recent statements, high-profile Israeli hawks have argued that an Iranian nuclear weapons program would not pose an existential threat to Israel, in part because they realize that the alternative could be regional war. So why is it that neoconservatives and other pro-Israel hardliners in the United States continue to press for decisive action against Tehran from the safety of their offices in the United States? Read full story.

FEATURED PROFILES

Emanuele Ottolenghi
Ottolenghi, director of the Brussels-based Transatlantic Institute, keeps readers of the National Review, Commentary, and other rightist outlets up to date on whither the "war on terror" in Europe.

Will Marshall
Considered by some a neoconservative in Democrat’s clothing, Marshall helps run two rightist Democratic Party-aligned groups, the Democratic Leadership Council and the Progressive Policy Institute.

FreedomWorks (previously Empower America)
FreedomWorks is a rightist advocacy outfit created in 2004 out of the merger of Empower America and Citizens for a Sound Economy.

Marshall Wittmann
Senator Lieberman’s spokesperson, Wittmann has worked to put the Democratic Party on a hardline trail like the one blazed by Sen. "Scoop" Jackson.

Bruce Jackson
Bruce Jackson has founded several influential, hawkish advocacy groups, including the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq, a pressure group that worked to build public and congressional support for invading Iraq.

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

A New "Arc of Crisis"?
By Jim Lobe

The problems in Pakistan and the looming threat of a Turkish invasion of northern Iraq have come at an inconvenient moment for the Bush administration, which is trying to convince the public that it has finally turned the corner in the "war on terror." Read full story.

Stifling Dissent
By Gareth Porter

In a replay of the run-up to the invasion of Iraq, the Bush administration wants to prevent intelligence agencies from reporting inconvenient messages, in this case regarding Iran’s nuclear program. Read full story.

LETTERS

IRC encourages feedback and comments. Send letters to rightweb@irc-online.org. IRC reserves the right to edit comments for clarity and brevity. Be sure to include your full name. Thank you.

If you would like to see our variety of free ezines and listservs, please go to: http://www.irc-online.org/lists/.
To be removed from this list, please email rightweb@irc-online.org with “unsubscribe Right Web.”

Share RightWeb

Featured Profiles

Haim Saban is a media mogul and major donor to the Democratic Party known for his hardline stance on Israel and opposition to the Iran nuclear deal.


Nikki Haley, Donald Trump’s first U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, is known for her lock-step support for Israel and is widely considered to be a future presidential candidate.


Brian Hook is the director of policy planning and senior policy advisor to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and is the head of the Iran Action Group.


Josh Rogin is a journalist known for his support for neoconservative policies and views.


Laurence Silberman, a senior justice on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, was a mentor to controversial Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and has been a vocal supporter of right-wing foreign and domestic agendas, including the campaign to support the invasion of Iraq.


The People’s Mujahedin of Iran, or MEK, advocates regime change in Iran and has strong connections with a wide range of top political figures in the U.S.


Eli Lake is a columnist for Bloomberg View who has a lengthy record of advocating for aggressive U.S. foreign policies towards the Middle East.


For media inquiries,
email rightwebproject@gmail.com

From the Wires

Jobs should not be an excuse to arm a murderous regime that not only appears to be behind the assassination of a U.S. resident and respected commentator but is also responsible for thousands of civilian casualties in Yemen—the majority killed with U.S-supplied bombs, combat aircraft, and tactical assistance.


The contradictions in Donald Trump’s foreign policy create opportunities for both rivals and long-standing (if irritated) US allies to challenge American influence. But Trump’s immediate priority is political survival, and his actions in the international arena are of little concern to his domestic supporters.


While the notion that criticism of Israel is anti-Semitic is decades old, it has been bolstered in recent years, by the campaign to add to the definition of anti-Semitism any criticism that singles Israel out and doesn’t apply the same standard to other countries. The bottom line is that this entire effort is designed not to combat anti-Semitism but to silence criticism. 


Short-term thinking, expedience, and a lack of strategic caution has led Washington to train, fund, and support group after group that have turned their guns on American soldiers and civilians.


Trump is not the problem. Think of him instead as a summons to address the real problem, which in a nation ostensibly of, by, and for the people is the collective responsibility of the people themselves. For Americans to shirk that responsibility further will almost surely pave the way for more Trumps — or someone worse — to come.


The United Nations has once again turn into a battleground between the United States and Iran, which are experiencing one of the darkest moments in their bilateral relations.


In many ways, Donald Trump’s bellicosity, his militarism, his hectoring cant about American exceptionalism and national greatness, his bullying of allies—all of it makes him not an opponent of neoconservatism but its apotheosis. Trump is a logical culmination of the Bush era as consolidated by Obama.


RightWeb
share