Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Armchair warmongers challenging the Iran deal

Elliott Abrams Elliot Abrams has called for “reversing” the Iran deal and wildly accused President Obama of resorting to anti-Semitism in his criticisms of the deal’s opponents. "The president … must know that he is here feeding a deep line of anti-Semitism that accuses American Jews of getting America into wars," Abrams proclaimed in a…

Elliott Abrams

Elliot Abrams has called for “reversing” the Iran deal and wildly accused President Obama of resorting to anti-Semitism in his criticisms of the deal’s opponents. "The president … must know that he is here feeding a deep line of anti-Semitism that accuses American Jews of getting America into wars," Abrams proclaimed in a recent op-ed.

Henry Sokolski

Sokolski, a former aide to Paul Wolfowitz, is the executive director of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center and a member of the board of advisors of the controversial activist group United Against Nuclear Iran. Along with the controversial analyst David Albright, Sokolski is one of a very small handful of arms control “experts” who have heaped criticism on the Iran deal.

Eric Edelman

Eric Edelman, a former advisor to Vice President Dick Cheney and longtime opponent of the Iran nuclear negotiations, argued at a recent Senate hearing that Congress should consider “coupling its disapproval of the deal with authorization for the use of force to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapons capability.”

Joe Lieberman

Former Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-CT), an outspoken opponent of the Iran deal, recently became chairman of the controversial United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) and joined the advisory board of the AIPAC-backed Citizens for a Nuclear Free Iran. He has urged members of Congress to revoke the agreement, declaring: "I can't think of a vote that I cast, apart from the ones deploying American troops into combat, that was as important as this agreement is to the future security of the United States.” Quipped one observer: “For those who are noting the overlap between Iraq war promoters and Iran deal saboteurs, Lieberman is your man."

Bret Stephens

Bret Stephens, a neoconservative Wall Street Journal columnist and supporter of the Iraq War, has bizarrely stated that voting for the Iran deal would be like having voted “for the Iraq War” and would similarly come back to “haunt” members of Congress. The Intercept's Glenn Greenwald said of Stephens' remarks: "First, note the bizarre equation of support for the war in Iraq with support for a peace deal with Iran. Second, since when do neocons like Stephens talk about the Iraq War as something shameful, as a 'stain' on one's legacy?”

Ray Takeyh

Iran-hawk Ray Takeyh, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, argues in a recent op-ed that Congress should reject the Iran deal and misleadingly suggests the United States could still push for a “more stringent” deal with Iran. “No agreement is perfect, but at times the scale of imperfection is so great that the judicious course is to reject the deal and renegotiate a more stringent one,” wrote Takeyh.

American Security Initiative

The American Security Initiative is an anti-Iran deal advocacy organization spearheaded by hawkish former Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-CT), Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), Evan Bayh (D-IN), and Norm Coleman (R-MN). Renowned for its alarmist ads about Iran’s nuclear program, the group recently announced a $6.5 million ad campaign that the New York Times has said is “aimed at derailing President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran.” Commentators have noted that AIC “clearly swing Democrats in mind” in regards to constituencies its ads are targeting.

David Albright

David Albright’s criticisms of the Iran nuclear deal have placed him amongst a diminishingly small group of arms control “experts” who oppose or seek to change the agreement. Underscoring Albright’s isolation, Mark Wallace of the controversial activist group United Against a Nuclear Iran was hard-pressed during a recent interview to identify many anti-deal figures in the arms control community, stating: “David Albright, even though he’s not affiliated with us, has been very useful.”

Letters from Right Web readers

My comment is very short:

1. Republicans are envious of President Obama's diplomatic skills and do not know how to react to his successes. So they have smeared him, behaving like naughty children towards their parents.

2. Not one Republican has any idea how to settle any domestic or international problems, without showing off with the war alternative—getting rich on the weapons industry.

3. Hopefully, Mr. Trump will be the GOP Presidential candidate because that would be the end of this treacherous, frightening, so-called Party.

Ulrike Siddiqi

Share RightWeb

Featured Profiles

The brainchild of Sears-Roebuck heiress Nina Rosenwald, the Gatestone Institute is a New York-based advocacy organization formerly chaired by John Bolton that is notorious for spreading misinformation about Muslims and advocating extremely hawkish views on everything from Middle East policy to immigration.


Conrad Black is a former media mogul closely connected to rightist political factions in the United States who was convicted in July 2007 for fraud and obstruction of justice and later pardoned by his friend President Trump.


David Friedman is U.S. Ambassador to Israel under Donald Trump. He is known for his extreme views on Israel, which include opposition to the creation of a Palestinian state and support for Israeli settlements.


Jason Greenblatt is the Special Representative for International Negotiations for President Donald Trump primarily working on the Israel-Palestine conflict.


The neoconservative Foundation for Defense of Democracies has re-established itself as a primary driver of hawkish foreign policy, especially in the Middle East, during the Trump administration.


Rupert Murdoch is the head of News Corp, the parent company of Fox News, and a long-time supporter of neoconservative campaigns to influence U.S. foreign policy.


Shmuley Boteach is a “celebrity rabbi” known for his controversial “pro-Israel” advocacy.


For media inquiries,
email rightwebproject@gmail.com

From the Wires

A series of escalations in both word and deed have raised fears of U.S.-Iranian military confrontation, either direct or by proxy. It is urgent that cooler heads prevail – in European capitals as in Tehran and Washington – to head off the threat of a disastrous war.


Vladimir Putin excels at taking advantage of mistakes made by Russia’s adversaries to further his country’s interests. Donald Trump’s Iran policy has given Putin plenty of opportunity to do that.


The Trump administration’s claims about purported Iranian threats have been repeated by credulous reporters and TV news programs far and wide.


This is the cartoon that the international edition of the New York Times should have run, at least as regards U.S. policy toward Iran.


The assault on Tripoli by Khalifa Haftar, Libya’s renegade general and leader of the self-anointed Libyan National Army (LNA), has forced an indefinite postponement of key UN peace efforts in the country even as the Trump White House announced that the president recognized Haftar’s “important” role in fighting terrorists.


With all eyes focused these days on Donald Trump and his myriad crimes, John Bolton’s speeches are a reminder that even worse options are waiting in the wings.


Advocates of cutting U.S. aid to Israel rather than using it as leverage must understand how this aid works, how big a challenge it represents for advocacy, and how to make a potentially successful argument against it.


RightWeb
share