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Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Whither Af-Pak?; From the Makers of PNAC; The Rebirth of COIN; Profiles on the Cheneys

FEATURED ARTICLE

Whither “Af-Pak”?

By Najum Mushtaq

The near simultaneous reappointment of a sacked Supreme Court judge and the signing of an agreement to allow Sharia courts in certain areas have created a bewildering judicial divide in Pakistan. In this battle of the courts, however, there is a real opportunity for President Obama to take a new approach to Pakistan and depart from the disastrous path cut by President George W. Bush and his predecessors. But unless President Obama listens to the people of Pakistan and recognizes the currents of change in this traumatized country, the administration’s strategy of linking Pakistan and Afghan policy—the so-called Af-Pak plan—could spark a spiraling conflict with devastating, far-reaching repercussions. Read full story.

 

FEATURED PROFILES

Foreign Policy Initiative
The Foreign Policy Initiative, an advocacy group founded by the same ideologues who brought us the Project for the New American Century, used its inaugural event to praise President Obama’s decision to increase military support in Afghanistan.

Dick Cheney
The former VP has not been shy in defending the Bush administration’s record and attacking the new president.

Lynne Cheney
A staunch defender of the policies pursued by her husband while he was VP, Lynne Cheney  recently completed a biography of James Madison.

Elizabeth Cheney
The former VP’s daughter and Bush advisor on Mideast policy, Elizabeth Cheney made headlines recently when Slate.com discovered her senior thesis on presidential war powers, which shows an uncanny resemblance to efforts by her father to consolidate executive powers.

 

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

Neocons and Liberal Hawks Converge on Counterinsurgency
By Daniel Luban (Inter Press Service)

As the United States boosts its forces in Afghanistan, hawks in both Republican and Democratic circles are championing “small wars” theory and counterinsurgency doctrine as guides for the U.S. military. Full story.

Some Strategists Cast Doubt on Afghan War Rationale
Analysis by Gareth Porter

Some analysts argue that the Obama administration’s battle against Al Qaeda in Afghanistan is misplaced and will spur the group to become further entrenched in Pakistan. Full story.

Tehran Rebuffs U.S. Overtures
By Meena Janardhan

Iran’s dismissive response to U.S. attempts at engagement will likely isolate it even further, much to the detriment of Middle East stability. Full story.

Neocon Ideologues Launch New Foreign Policy Group
By Daniel Luban and Jim Lobe

The newly founded Foreign Policy Initiative, led by the same neocon writers who set up the Project for the New American Century, supports a “surge” in Afghanistan and stresses “threats” from countries like Russia and China. Full story.

 

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