Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

The Pitfalls of Forecasting Foreign Policy; Plus, Profiles on Freedom’s Watch, 1992 Draft Defense Pl

FEATURED ARTICLE

The Pitfalls of Forecasting Foreign Policy
By Leon Hadar

With change imminent in the Oval Office, it is fashionable to predict how the future occupant will handle foreign policy. Yet the popular method for doing this, examining campaign statements, is problematic and unreliable, as history makes clear. According to the Cato Institute’s Leon Hadar, a far better barometer is one that assesses basic foreign policy dispositions by asking which camp candidates fall into—Hamiltonian, Jeffersonian, Jacksonian, or Wilsonian. But even then, surprises likely await.
Read full story.

FEATURED PROFILES

Freedom’s Watch
The pro-Iraq War advocacy group, known for its multimillion-dollar ad campaign aimed at supporting the "surge," has seen many of its staff resign in recent weeks.

1992 Draft Defense Planning Guidance
The 1992 draft Defense Planning Guidance played a singular role in shaping the "war on terror" strategies of the George W. Bush administration. Recently declassified documents shed light on the document’s origins.

Stephen Cambone
Cambone made headlines in 2004 for his role in the prison abuse scandal; now the former czar for defense intelligence is back in the news for the sweet contracts his former department is giving to his new employer.

Fred Iklé
A former anti-Soviet hardliner and backer of neoconservative policy, Iklé has soured on the Bush administration’s "war on terror" and says that an attack on Iran would be a "catastrophic failure."

Reuel Marc Gerecht
As with some other neoconservatives, Gerecht’s seemingly diplomatic line on Iran is thin cover for his unrepentant interventionism.

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

The Growing Militarization of Foreign Policy
By Jim Lobe

Military commanders are taking the reins of U.S. foreign policy, jeopardizing civilian control of foreign relations, and Congress is doing nothing to stop it. Read full story

The Vanishing Laptop Scoop
By Gareth Porter

As the International Atomic Energy Agency investigates Iranian nuclear weapons activities, the origins of one part of the evidence against Tehran— the so—called laptop documentspurportedly revealing weapons plans—remain in doubt. Read full story

LETTERS

Congratulations on an excellent overview that serves as an essential introduction to the right-wing forces that have shaped our domestic and foreign policies for so long-though mostly unknown and hidden from public view and scrutiny.

This in itself is more than reason enough to support your work.

-Rudy Rasin

Right Web encourages feedback and comments. Send letters to rightwebfeedback@publiceye.org PRA reserves the right to edit comments for clarity and brevity. Be sure to include your full name and location. Thank you.

If you would like to see our variety of free ezines and listservs, please go to: http://www.irc-online.org/lists/.
To be removed from this list, please email rightweb@irc-online.org with “unsubscribe Right Web.”

–>

Share RightWeb

Featured Profiles

Update was slow, but still no lag in the editor window, and footnotes are intact.     This has been updated – Bernard Lewis, who passed away in May 2018, was a renowned British-American historian of Islam and the Middle East. A former British intelligence officer, Foreign Office staffer, and Princeton University professor, Lewis was…


Bernard Lewis was a renowned historian of Islam and the Middle East who stirred controversy with his often chauvinistic attitude towards the Muslim world and his associations with high-profile neoconservatives and foreign policy hawks.


John Bolton, the controversial former U.S. ambassador to the UN and dyed-in the-wool foreign policy hawk, is President Trump’s National Security Adviser McMaster, reflecting a sharp move to the hawkish extreme by the administration.


Michael Joyce, who passed away in 2006, was once described by neoconservative guru Irving Kristol as the “godfather of modern philanthropy.”


Mike Pompeo, the Trump administration’s second secretary of state, is a long time foreign policy hawk and has led the public charge for an aggressive policy toward Iran.


Max Boot, neoconservative military historian at the Council on Foreign Relations, on Trump and Russia: “At every turn Trump is undercutting the ‘get tough on Russia’ message because he just can’t help himself, he just loves Putin too much.”


Michael Flynn is a former Trump administration National Security Advisor who was forced to step down only weeks on the job because of his controversial contacts with Russian officials before Trump took office.


For media inquiries,
email rightwebproject@gmail.com

From the Wires

Trump is not the problem. Think of him instead as a summons to address the real problem, which in a nation ostensibly of, by, and for the people is the collective responsibility of the people themselves. For Americans to shirk that responsibility further will almost surely pave the way for more Trumps — or someone worse — to come.


The United Nations has once again turn into a battleground between the United States and Iran, which are experiencing one of the darkest moments in their bilateral relations.


In many ways, Donald Trump’s bellicosity, his militarism, his hectoring cant about American exceptionalism and national greatness, his bullying of allies—all of it makes him not an opponent of neoconservatism but its apotheosis. Trump is a logical culmination of the Bush era as consolidated by Obama.


For the past few decades the vast majority of private security companies like Blackwater and DynCorp operating internationally have come from a relatively small number of countries: the United States, Great Britain and other European countries, and Russia. But that seeming monopoly is opening up to new players, like DeWe Group, China Security and Protection Group, and Huaxin Zhongan Group. What they all have in common is that they are from China.


The Trump administration’s massive sales of tanks, helicopters, and fighter aircraft are indeed a grim wonder of the modern world and never receive the attention they truly deserve. However, a potentially deadlier aspect of the U.S. weapons trade receives even less attention than the sale of big-ticket items: the export of firearms, ammunition, and related equipment.


Soon after a Saudi-led coalition strike on a bus killed 40 children on August 9, a CENTCOM spokesperson stated to Vox, “We may never know if the munition [used] was one that the U.S. sold to them.”


The West has dominated the post-war narrative with its doctrine of liberal values, arguing that not only were they right in themselves but that economic success itself depended on their application. Two developments have challenged those claims. The first was the West’s own betrayal of its principles: on too many occasions the self interest of the powerful, and disdain for the victims of collateral damage, has showed through. The second dates from more recently: the growth of Chinese capitalism owes nothing to a democratic system of government, let alone liberal values.


RightWeb
share