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Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

The Pitfalls of Forecasting Foreign Policy; Plus, Profiles on Freedom’s Watch, 1992 Draft Defense Pl

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FEATURED ARTICLE

The Pitfalls of Forecasting Foreign Policy
By Leon Hadar

With change imminent in the Oval Office, it is fashionable to predict how the future occupant will handle foreign policy. Yet the popular method for doing this, examining campaign statements, is problematic and unreliable, as history makes clear. According to the Cato Institute’s Leon Hadar, a far better barometer is one that assesses basic foreign policy dispositions by asking which camp candidates fall into—Hamiltonian, Jeffersonian, Jacksonian, or Wilsonian. But even then, surprises likely await.
Read full story.

FEATURED PROFILES

Freedom’s Watch
The pro-Iraq War advocacy group, known for its multimillion-dollar ad campaign aimed at supporting the "surge," has seen many of its staff resign in recent weeks.

1992 Draft Defense Planning Guidance
The 1992 draft Defense Planning Guidance played a singular role in shaping the "war on terror" strategies of the George W. Bush administration. Recently declassified documents shed light on the document’s origins.

Stephen Cambone
Cambone made headlines in 2004 for his role in the prison abuse scandal; now the former czar for defense intelligence is back in the news for the sweet contracts his former department is giving to his new employer.

Fred Iklé
A former anti-Soviet hardliner and backer of neoconservative policy, Iklé has soured on the Bush administration’s "war on terror" and says that an attack on Iran would be a "catastrophic failure."

Reuel Marc Gerecht
As with some other neoconservatives, Gerecht’s seemingly diplomatic line on Iran is thin cover for his unrepentant interventionism.

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

The Growing Militarization of Foreign Policy
By Jim Lobe

Military commanders are taking the reins of U.S. foreign policy, jeopardizing civilian control of foreign relations, and Congress is doing nothing to stop it. Read full story

The Vanishing Laptop Scoop
By Gareth Porter

As the International Atomic Energy Agency investigates Iranian nuclear weapons activities, the origins of one part of the evidence against Tehran— the so—called laptop documentspurportedly revealing weapons plans—remain in doubt. Read full story

LETTERS

Congratulations on an excellent overview that serves as an essential introduction to the right-wing forces that have shaped our domestic and foreign policies for so long-though mostly unknown and hidden from public view and scrutiny.

This in itself is more than reason enough to support your work.

-Rudy Rasin

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Featured Profiles

Former Sen. Jim Talent (R-MO), a stalwart advocate of Pentagon spending now based at the right-wing Heritage Foundation, says he would have voted for the Iraq War even if he had known the Bush administration’s claims about WMDs were false.


Mike Pompeo (R-KS) is a conservative Republican congressman who was voted into office as part of the “tea party” surge in 2011 and nominated by Donald Trump to be director of the CIA.


Although better known for his domestic platform promoting “limited” government, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) has expressed strong sympathies for projecting U.S. military power abroad.


James “Mad Dog” Mattis is a retired U.S Marine Corps general and combat veteran who served as commander of U.S. Central Command during 2010-2013 before being removed by the Obama administration reportedly because of differences over Iran policy.


Sen. Mark Kirk (R-IL) was one of Congress’s staunchest foreign policy hawks and a “pro-Israel” hardliner.


A self-styled terrorism “expert” who claims that the killing of Osama bin Laden strengthened Al Qaeda, former right-wing Lebanese militia member Walid Phares wildly claims that the Obama administration gave the Muslim Brotherhood “the green light” to sideline secular Egyptians.


Weekly Standard editor and PNAC cofounder Bill Kristol is a longtime neoconservative activist and Washington political operative.


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