Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Right Web Profiles - Organizations


Can't find what you're looking for? Try browsing our other profile pages: Individuals, Government, Funders, Organizations, Media, Businesses,

-

A vehicle for the controversial writer Rachel Ehrenfeld, the American Center for Democracy is a Manhattan-based nonprofit dedicated to “exposing and monitoring threats to the national security of the U.S. and Western democracies.” In recent publications, Ehrenfeld has warned that the U.S. is vulnerable to an “electromagnetic pulse” attack from Iran or North Korea and chided President Obama for “attempting to pacify the Muslim/Arab world” by “sitting on the fence” over Syria.

-

The American Committee for Peace in the Caucasus is an alliance of neoconservatives, liberal hawks, and peace activists working toward greater autonomy in the Caucasus, primarily with an eye to weakening Russia for U.S. strategic benefit.

-

The American Committee for Peace in the Caucasus, a largely defunct Freedom House initiative that aimed to isolate Russia, attracted media attention after the Boston bombings because of its neoconservative-led efforts to “make friends” with Muslims in that corner of the globe in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. As one writer commented shortly after the Boston attack, “even neocons were for Chechens before they were against them.”

-

A core member of the Old Right, the ACU has helped drive the Republican Party further right since the election of President Obama.

-

Writers based at the American Enterprise Institute, an important source of neoconservative advocacy on U.S. foreign policy, have steadfastly promoted U.S. support for Taiwan. As one reporter discovered recently, this should come as little surprise. Taiwan appears to have been a generous funder to AEI. In 2009, the Taiwanese government gave more than half a million dollars to the think tank, even as some AEI employees were agitating for U.S. arms sales to the country. This fact led one transparency expert to conclude that the organization should be obliged to register as a foreign agent.

-

From its support for Salvadoran death squads to its enthusiasm for an aggressive “war on terror,” the American Foreign Policy Council has pushed a hawkish agenda on foreign affairs since its founding in 1982. Ilan Berman, the group’s vice president, recently argued that the Obama administration’s sanctions on Iran were “flimsy,” even as the country experiences a currency crisis and plummeting oil exports. Berman said the administration should push for “full enforcement” of energy sanctions nonetheless, even if it risked a downturn in U.S. relations with Russia or China, leading one commentator to muse that Berman’s “prescriptions for the Islamic Republic are starting to sound a lot like a movie we've already seen.”

-

After failing to marshal support for a U.S. military strike on Syria and head off renewed nuclear negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 powers, AIPAC has been forced to back down again—this time from its bid to pass new sanctions on Iran while talks are underway over the future of its nuclear enrichment program. The group recently failed to persuade enough Democrats to back sanctions legislation sponsored by the hawkish Sens. Mark Kirk (R-IL) and Robert Menendez (D-NJ). Critics in and outside of government accused the bill's supporters of trying to sink the negotiations and start a war.

-

Once described as the “heart and soul of the military-industrial complex,” the American Security Council was an influential old-guard conservative group during the early Cold War that latter served as a key institutional vehicle for anti-détente militarism.

-

The American Turkish Council is an influential beltway organization chaired by former Bush Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage that serves as a conduit for U.S.-Turkish relations despite being marred by scandals involving bribery of government officials.

-

About . Founded in 2001 by then-Bradley Foundation head Michael Joyce at the behest of Karl Rove, George W. Bush's personal adviser, Americans for Community and Faith-Centered Enterprise...

-

Americans for Peace and Tolerance is a Boston-based advocacy group founded by "pro-Israel" and anti-Islamic activist Charles Jacobs.

-

Founded shortly after 9/11, the Claremont Institute-based Americans for Victory over Terrorism champions “victory” in the “war on terrorism,” in part by promoting “research about Islam and Islamism” and “attacking those who would blame America first.”

-

The Israel-based Ariel Center for Policy Research is a right-wing advocacy and research institute founded in 1997 that espouses a militant ideology and is associated with conservative “pro-Israel” advocacy groups in the United States.

-

An academic center of the American conservative movement, the Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs has been a vigorous defender of the war on terrorism and an unequivocal supporter for Israel.

-

This now defunct speakers bureau and PR firm played an important role promoting neoconservative voices in the U.S. media after 9/11.

-

Benador Public Relations is the successor company to Benador Associates, a PR firm that played a key role promoting major neoconservative figures during the first George W. Bush administration.

-

Joe Lieberman, the “Independent Democrat” from Connecticut who retired from the Senate in early 2013, has found a new soapbox at the recently launched Bipartisan Coalition for American Security (BCAS). Founded in June 2013 with Lieberman and former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown as co-chairs, BCAS is the latest effort by hawks to provide a bipartisan sheen to a litany of agenda items, including threatening action against Iran, launching airstrikes against Syria, and maintaining a robust U.S. military budget. According to a statement on the group’s website, BCAS’s “singular goal is to ensure that America remains the most powerful nation in the world.”

-

The ostensibly centrist Bipartisan Policy Center has played an important role in shifting Beltway rhetoric on Iran to the hawkish right. In late 2012, for example, BPC “Iran Task Force” members Dennis Ross, Michael Makovsky, and Charles Robb took to the Wall Street Journal to argue that the economic impact of a hypothetical “nuclear Iran” would be more detrimental than an actual U.S. strike on the country. The argument, which was disputed by critics, essentially aimed to provide an economic case for going to war. The report came on the tail end of a year in which the center published a slew of documents devoted to pressuring the United States to “stop the clock” on Iran’s alleged nuclear weapons program.

-

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation (“the Bradley Foundation”) has been called "the country's largest and most influential right-wing organization" because of the volume...

-

Castle Rock Foundation . The Castle Rock Foundation (CRF), a major supporter of the Heritage Foundation and other rightist institutions and causes, is an outgrowth of the Adolph Coors Foundation,...

-

A technocratic “liberal hawk” think thank that has been a key source of counterinsurgency strategizing for the Obama administration, the Center for a New American Security is staffed with a host counterinsurgency enthusiasts, some of whom have supported neoconservative-led policy campaigns. As one writer notes, CNAS made its name not by denouncing misguided U.S. wars in the Middle East, but by making “recommendations for how to wage the wars more effectively.” A recent CNAS report on Iraq highlights this tendency. In noting that the Iraq War “left over 100,000 Iraqis dead, enabled the resurgence of Iran, and tarnished the reputation of U.S. democracy promotion,” the report did not warn against such interventions; rather, it argued that U.S. policymakers should “internalize these lessons … when intervening elsewhere in the future.”

-

The Center for American Freedom, a neoconservative advocacy group, publishes the Washington Free Beacon, a “combat journalism” outlet designed to counter the supposedly liberal media elite.

-

Since the 2013 election of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, the Center for Security Policy has relentlessly protested any signs of diplomatic rapprochement between Tehran and Washington. “By simply meeting with Mr. Rouhani, let alone by making other, more tangible concessions to Iran’s president, Mr. Obama would confer a legitimacy on the self-professed Iranian con man that is unwarranted,” wrote CSP President Frank Gaffney in September 2013, insisting that Rouhani was less moderate than he appeared to be. Arguing that only the threat of military force could resolve the standoff, Gaffney concluded that Obama “should be open to congressional enactment of an authorization for the use of military force in Iran,” even if such a resolution would wreck negotiations.

-

Created in early 2006 by Christian Right leader John Hagee, the influential evangelical pastor of the Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, Texas, Christians United for Israel (CUFI) is a Christian...

-

A bastion of conservative scholarship and advocacy, the Claremont Institute hosts a number of programs that push hawkish foreign policies.

-

A controversial activist group closely connected to anti-Islamic political factions, the Clarion Project has released films and publications that attack “Radical Islam” and call into question the trustworthiness of Muslims in general. Previously known as the Clarion Fund, the neoconservative-linked group has been responsible for anti-Islamic films like Obsession and pro-war projects like Iranium. It now claims to be working on a film about "the cruel and often violent oppression of Muslim women."

-

Founded by AIPAC heavyweight Morris Amitay, the Coalition for Democracy in Iran is a defunct pressure group that helped push anti-Iran resolutions through Congress.

-

The Committee for the Liberation of Iraq (CLI) was a short-lived yet influential group of hawkish Beltway think-tankers and politicians who came together at the behest of the George W. Bush...

-

The Committee on the Present Danger is a neoconservative Cold War-era pressure group that was re-launched in 2004 to focus on the “war on terror.” Although the group has been largely dormant in recent years, its website continues to plug fear-mongering media stories and op-eds targeting Iran.

-

Concerned Women for America  (CWA), a Christian Right advocacy group founded to combat the influence of “anti-God” feminists, recently made “support for Israel” one of its core issues. As part of its newfound mission, the group lobbied in support of the Kirk-Menendez “insurance policy” sanctions on Iran, which critics said were designed to scuttle the ongoing negotiations over Iran’s nuclear enrichment program. The group has also drawn controversy in recent years for supporting anti-gay legislation in Russia and for publishing a host of anti-Islamic statements.

-

The Council for a Community of Democracies, a U.S-based NGO dedicated to advancing the positions of the intergovernmental organization Community of Democracies, touts U.S. exceptionalism while urging international cooperation in toppling undemocratic regimes.

-

Members of the Reagan-era Council for National Policy continue to help shape the U.S. political landscape even as the right-wing group maintains a cloak of secrecy over its activities and membership rolls.

-

When its tax-exempt status got in the way of aggressive lobbying, the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies created a new organization called Defense of Democracies, whose first project was a controversial ad campaign that raised concerns about partisanship.

-

The Democratic Leadership Council, which closed shop in 2011, was at the forefront of efforts to push the Democratic Party to adopt more conservative domestic policies and remain supportive of hawkish, Israel-centric Mideast policies.

-

The Ann Arbor-based Earhart Foundation, perhaps best known for its support of several Nobel-winning economists, is arguably one of the least understood foundations in U.S. philanthropy. It appears to...

-

The William Kristol-chaired Emergency Committee for Israel wants new sanctions on Iran now, and is angry that some members of the “pro-Israel” crowd, including AIPAC, appear to be waffling in the face of strong Democratic opposition in the Senate. In a recent press release calling for an immediate vote on the new sanctions bill, Kristol wrote: “It would be nice if there were universal bipartisan support for acting now to stop a nuclear Iran. But there apparently is not. And it would be terrible if history's judgment on the pro-Israel community was that it made a fetish of bipartisanship—and got a nuclear Iran.”

-

The now-defunct Empower America, a right-wing pressure group founded by former Education Secretary William Bennett in 1993, was the predecessor to the Tea Party-aligned FreedomWorks.

-

An “unabashedly pro-Israel and pro-American think tank,” EMET promotes the work of “pro-Israel” hawks in Washington, stokes fear of Islam and Muslims, and advocates a militarist U.S. posture toward the Middle East.

-

The post-Senate perch of Rick Santorum, EPPC sits at the crossroads of faith-based politics and hawkish neoconservativism.

-

Under a banner of tolerance and diversity, EFD works to promote hawkish security policies in Europe, the Middle East, and beyond.

-

Affiliated with Frank Gaffney’s Center for Security Policy, Family Security Matters offers hawkish, anti-Islamic rhetoric under the guise of “empowering” Americans and protecting families.

-

The Federalist Society, initially designed as a conservative alternative to the National Lawyers Guild, has blossomed into a powerful and influential group whose agenda includes promoting hardline anti-terror policies.

-

In the run-up to the Iraq War, the Project for the New American Century (PNAC) sought to drum up support across ideological lines for an aggressive U.S. campaign to reshape the Middle East by force. Though PNAC is now defunct, the Foreign Policy Initiative has taken up its mantle, releasing open letters—signed by many of the same neoconservatives and liberal hawks who clamored for the Iraq War—calling on the Obama administration to maintain a bloated military budget and to intervene militarily in various hotspots around the world. Most recently, the group called on Obama to launch "direct air strikes" against Syria and to arm Syrian rebels with the goal of changing another regime in the Middle East.

-

The Foreign Policy Research Institute is a conservative foreign policy think tank based in Philadelphia. Although many of its current scholars are realist skeptics of neoconservative interventionism, the institute has supported the work of a number of prominent hawks over the year, including Daniel Pipes, founder of the Middle East Forum. Several FPRI figures have advocated "standing aside" in Syria "so that some hateful, armed and dangerous people can get killed" and celebrated the military coup that brought down Egypt's elected Muslim Brotherhood government, which one FPRI writer claimed was "directly influenced by the Nazis."

-

The Forgotten American Coalition was a short-lived letterhead group founded in 2007 to rally religious conservatives against U.S. withdrawal from Iraq.

-

The Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD) is a leading neoconservative think tank and advocacy group. Although FDD presents itself as “bipartisan,” its leadership is overwhelmingly Republican, and in the past a political pressure group tied to FDD has targeted Democratic members of Congress. More recently, leaked documents have revealed that FDD’s funders come from a very small pool of Republican donors, including Home Depot founder Bernard Marcus, hedge fund billionaire Paul Singer, and casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, all of whom have donated liberally to right-wing causes.

-

The Foundation for Democracy in Iran, whose president has alleged that Iran was involved in the 9/11 attacks, frequently attackes Iranian-Americans who don’t share its hawkish views about the Islamic Republic.

-

Although no longer as closely associated with neoconservative activism as it was during much of the last few decades, Freedom House continues to support campaigns aligned with hawkish factions in U.S. politics.

-

Freedom Watch, a pressure group led by right-wing activist Larry Klayman, promotes a hodgepodge of conservative foreign and domestic polices, claiming to be “the only political advocacy group that speaks through actions, rather than just words.”

-

Freedom’s Watch, a now-defunct pro-Iraq War advocacy group from the latter days of the Bush administration, had a budget of some $56 million for the two years it was active. Declaring itself a tax-exempt “social welfare” organization, the group and its funders attracted the scrutiny of the IRS, which conducted an audit of its political activities in 2010, followed by an audit of its top funders in 2011. Conservative critics were quick to link the IRS’ actions to its contemporaneous scrutiny of Tea Party-linked organizations, but tax experts say the IRS acted within the law.

-

The influential Tea Party group FreedomWorks has made lots of headlines in 2013 for its internal rivalries and organizational shakeups. But the group has continued to exercise influence in the GOP, helping to push Republican members of Congress to shut down the federal government over the implementation of "Obamacare" and rallying its members against U.S. intervention in Syria. With FreedomWorks and other Tea Party groups rallying against an attack, even veteran neocons like Liz Cheney, a Republican Senate candidate in Wyoming and outspoken hawk cut from the same cloth as her father, have been compelled to walk back their past advocacy for war in pursuit of Tea Party votes.

-

The Gatestone Institute is a New York-based advocacy organization that is tied to neoconservative and other right-wing networks in the United States and Europe. The brainchild of Sears-Roebuck heiress Nina Rosenwald, Gatestone has played host to far-right anti-Islamic ideologues like Geert Wilders and produced a slew of commentaries railing against the purported influence of Sharia law in Europe and North America, the alleged nuclear ambitions of Iran, and the supposed malfeasances of Palestinians.

-

Global Governance Watch (GGW) is a joint initiative of two influential rightist groups, the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) and the Federalist Society. GGW was founded in 2008 with the mission...

-

Grace Park Media has produced a number of rightist TV shows and documentaries, including a documentary on the history of neoconservatism written by a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and James Glassman’s Ideas in Action.

-

Many conservative activists cried foul after the 2010 discovery of JournoList, a listserv where well-known moderate-to-progressive reporters and wonks discussed politics and current events. But now Mother Jones has reported the existence of Groundswell, which one observer describes as "a B-list of extreme foreign policy hawks, social conservatives, anti-immigration activists, and voter ID proponents" dedicated to sharpening right-wing talking points across a variety of issues—in other words, "a weird parody of … what [conservatives] imagined JournoList to be." Participants in the group include the spouse of a Supreme Court Justice, at least two former members of Congress, and a staffer to Sen. Ted Cruz, as well as outspoken foreign policy hawks like John Bolton and Frank Gaffney.

-

A bastion of trans-Atlantic neoconservatism and Islamophobia, the UK-based Henry Jackson Society promotes “regime change” in Iran and hardline "pro-Israel" policies in the Middle East. In recent publications, members of the group have called on the United States to lead an armed intervention in Syria and dismissed the P5+1 talks between western powers and Iran as “sham negotiations” that “defang the military threat of any credibility.” The group’s head Alan Mendoza warned an audience at this year’s American Israel Public Affairs Committee convention that increasing Muslim immigration to Europe is weakening the continent’s support for Israel, while its associate director Douglas Murray has proposed that “Conditions for Muslims in Europe must be made harder across the board.”

-

The Heritage Foundation, which has consistently harangued the Obama administration for purportedly being weak on foreign policy, argues that containment of Iran will fail and all military options should be on the table.

-

High Frontier, a pressure group pushing for “Star Wars” missile defense systems, has deep connections to defense contractors, government officials, and prominent neoconservatives.

-

The Stanford University-based Hoover Institution has served for decades as an outside-the-beltway home for Republican Party apparatchiks and as an important source of militarist policy proposals.

-

The Hudson Institute, part of a closely-knit group of neoconservative policy institutes that champion aggressive and Israel-centric U.S. foreign policies, has seen a number of its scholars in recent months press for regime change in Iran. Hudson’s “Scooter” Libby and Hillel Fradkin have worried in op-eds about nuclear-armed mullahs motived by the “religious obligation to create an Islamic new world order,” while Meyrav Wurmser has argued that because Iran’s purported nuclear program poses an “existential threat” to Israel, “Israel must possess the means to deter or defeat the realization of that threat."

-

Ideas in Action is a rightist TV program co-produced by the George W. Bush Institute and Grace Creek Media that often features prominent neoconservatives opining on U.S. domestic and foreign policy.

-

Founded in the early 1990s to defend Republican Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas against sexual harassment charges, the Independent Women’s Forum has a history of opposing virtually every “women’s rights” initiative. The group attracted headlines recently when one of its senior fellows testified before the Senate that guns, particularly those that can accommodate high-capacity magazines, “make women safer”—a claim that is directly at odds with independent research on the subject.

-

The Institute for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies is an enigmatic Israel-based organization with deep ties to U.S. neoconservatives that is notorious for publishing tirades about Islam’s purported take over of the West.

-

Founded in 2007, the Institute for the Study of War is a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that has supported long-term U.S. military intervention abroad, particularly in Iraq and Afghanistan. Led by Kimberly Kagan, the group has increasingly attracted the support of military contractors with active stakes in the wars the group supports prolonging.

-

The Institute of World Politics is a Washington, D.C.-based graduate school closely tied to right-wing networks in the United States.

-

The Institute on Religion and Democracy, a conservative Christian advocacy group with roots in Cold War neoconservative advocacy, fashions itself as "a watchdog of the religious and evangelical left." Devoted to undermining the influence of liberalism on mainline Protestant churches, the group opposes efforts to combat climate change, has spoken out against "amnesty" for undocumented migrants, and has advocated a hawkish line on foreign policy. It has also taken up traditional conservative concerns like opposition to abortion and gay rights.

-

The Institute on Religion and Public Life publishes First Things magazine, a journal of contemporary religious right thought. Founded by the late Richard John Neuhaus—a "theocon" who blended conservative religious views with hawkish foreign policy advocacy—IRPL aims "to advance a religiously informed public policy for the ordering of society." Although First Things tends to focus on cultural and theological debates, its authors helped promote the invasion of Iraq, defended the war in Afghanistan, and criticized pacifist Christianity as "morally perverse" and "eschatological madness."

-

The International Intelligence Summit is a forum for intelligence and military experts who advocate new tactics in the “war on terror.”

-

Along with its Democratic-aligned counterpart, the taxpayer-funded International Republican Institute has often been accused of subverting democracy abroad while claiming to foster it.

-

IPC advocates regime change in Iran by empowering opposition groups—by which it means the terrorist-designated MEK, not the Green Movement.

-

In March 2011, with the United States engaged in several military conflicts across the Greater Middle East, Freedom House and the Progressive Policy Institute created the Iran Strategy Task Force to lobby the Obama administration to aggressively pursue regime change in Iran.

-

Founded in 1984, the Jamestown Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank closely associated with right-wing actors that monitors security trends from Eurasia to Africa, has been dogged by allegations that it secretly works with the CIA and allied governments. In April 2013, the group attracted renewed scrutiny after the Russian media reported that the foundation had funded a conference attended by one of the Boston marathon bombing suspects in Tbilisi, Georgia, stoking speculation that the group may have been linked to an alleged Georgian effort to funnel militants into the restive Russian province of Dagestan.

-

The Jerusalem Summit is an Israel-based advocacy group that brings together evangelical Christians, U.S.-based neoconservatives, and international “pro-Israel” organizations to press an anti-Palestinian agenda. Although the group appears to be largely dormant, it maintains an active presence on Facebook, where it posts images and messages mocking the notion of Palestinian statehood, promoting IDF talking points, and calling the “1.4 million Muslims living in Israel” an “obstacle to peace.”

-

A prominent member of the rightwing “pro-Israel” lobby, JINSA claims to be "the most influential group on the issue of U.S.-Israel military relations." Specializing in facilitating military-to-military ties between the United States and Israel, JINSA recently hired Michael Makovsky as its CEO. A dual U.S.-Israeli citizen and veteran of the Israeli army, Makovsky previously ran the foreign policy program at the Bipartisan Policy Center, where he oversaw numerous studies aimed at pressuring the United States to adopt a more confrontational approach with Iran.

-

The John M. Olin Foundation, once one of the country’s premier conservative foundations, closed down in 2005 after a half century of operations. Among its more notable grantees were the...

-

This new rightwing pressure group—led by Liz Cheney and William Kristol—is circulating a petition pushing to keep “Gitmo” open, claiming it is a “safe, secure, and humane” way to keep “terrorists” locked up.

-

One of a string of astrotruf groups launched by neoconservatives and Christian Right figures, Keep Israel Safe produced several webvideos that mischaracterize the Obama administration’s policies on Israel and Iran.

-

<p>The Lexington Institute, which has been called “the defense industry's pay-to-play ad agency,” is notorious for accepting large donations from military contractors to publish studies advocating military spending programs.</p>

-

The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research is an influential rightist think tank chaired by hedge fund magnate Paul Singer, an important financial backer of neoconservative advocacy groups like the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. The Manhattan Institute has promoted lower taxes on the rich, public service cuts for the poor, and controversial "stop and frisk" police practices. Through its influential quarterly magazine, City Journal, many Manhattan Institute figures also weigh in on foreign policy. In a recent column, City Journal contributing editor Judith Miller—notorious for her efforts to relay Ahmed Chalabi's false intelligence about Iraq as a New York Times reporter—expressed "profound skepticism" about any international agreement to disarm Syria of its chemical weapons.

-

The Middle East Forum (MEF) is a controversial Philadelphia-based policy institute that is notorious for its extremist rhetoric about Islam and Middle East politics. Through projects and publications like Middle East Quarterly, Campus Watch, and Islamist Watch, MEF sows suspicion about Muslims and Islamist movements and agitates for an aggressive U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. In 2013, founder Daniel Pipes notably broke with many of his fellow neoconservatives—and much of his own prior work—in arguing that instead of ousting Syrian president Bashar al-Assad, Washington should seek to ensure that the stalemated Syrian civil war goes on as long as possible to maximize the damage the various sides inflict on each other. He also argued that instead of voting to authorize the use of force in Syria, Congress should vote to attack Iran.

-

The “nonpartisan” MEMRI, which has received funding from the U.S. State Department and dozens of U.S.-based foundations, has drawn fire for its ties to neoconservative and anti-Islamic organizations, as well as for producing selective and at times inaccurate translations of Middle Eastern sources.

-

Missouri State University’s Department of Defense and Strategic Studies is a stronghold of rightist foreign policy scholars.

-

Though billing itself as a nonpartisan organization to “support the troops,” Move America Forward pursues a hawkish agenda aimed at increasing U.S. military intervention abroad.

-

The taxpayer-funded National Endowment for Democracy has often been accused of profoundly anti-democratic behavior.

-

This Cold War era think tank has found new reasons for promoting extravagant U.S. defenses, including to defend against “terrorist-supporting” states like Iran.

-

Founded by neoconservative trailblazer Irving Kristol in 1985, the National Interest has drifted away from its neocon roots since its takeover by the realist-oriented Nixon Center in 2001. Editor Jacob Heilbrunn, for example, recently defended libertarian Sen. Rand Paul against an onslaught of criticism from GOP hawks—including Irving Kristol's son William—who battered the Kentucky Republican over his opposition to U.S. intervention in Syria and Ukraine. Heilbrunn, who held out that Paul could revive the realist Republican school of foreign policy, likened Paul's critics to Cold War-era hawks who "were all full of talk of confrontation and readiness to resort to nuclear war" but who ultimately failed at the brass tacks of foreign policy.

-

In a new report, the National Strategy Information Center, which has been promoting militarist U.S. foreign policies since the 1960s, hypes the notion that the world is on the verge of chaos and that shadowy forces are engaged in an existential battle “against the West.”

-

Founded to help ensure Europe’s allegiance to U.S. policies, the now-defunct New Atlantic Initiative was aimed in part at preventing the emergence of a European strategic rival to the United States.

-

Under the guise of seeking accountability and transparency, the neoconservative-linked NGO Monitor launches partisan-minded assaults against NGOs who criticize the Israeli government.

-

NORPAC is a New Jersey-based political action committee that backs legislators who favor hardline "pro-Israel" policies. Sometimes referred to as “the little brother” of the powerful American Israel Political Action Committee, NORPAC recently flooded the U.S. Capitol with supporters calling on the United States to back Israel in the event that it goes to war with Iran.

-

One Jerusalem is a right-wing advocacy group that opposes any Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement that cedes part of Jerusalem to the Palestinians.

-

The People’s Mujahedin of Iran (MEK), a militant organization advocating the overthrow of the Islamic Republic of Iran, was for many years listed as a terrorist organization by the U.S. State Department. In September 2012, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced that the group would be removed from the terrorist list. The decision was a major victory for the group’s backers, who spent millions on an aggressive lobbying campaign that included a host of prominent former U.S. officials and a crop of longtime neoconservatives. The decision also raised a number of concerns about a potential backlash from Iran, which could have repercussions on efforts to negotiate limits to that country’s nuclear program.

-

The Philanthropy Roundtable is a research and advocacy group that helps right-wing donors funnel money to an assortment of philanthropic and political causes. The group, which has had numerous connections to neoconservative foundations and advocacy groups over the years, recently attracted notice for its role in helping bankroll efforts to fight environmental regulations.

-

Since its founding in 1989, the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) has advocated “market-friendly” economic policies and a hawkish line on foreign policy from within the Democratic Party. Closely associated with the now-defunct Democratic Leadership Council, the group has supported the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, advocated a “get-tough” line on Iran, and backed aggressive Israeli military actions towards the Palestinians. More recently, Politico included the group among a list of think tanks that could “hamstring” President Obama’s nomination of Chuck Hagel to head the Department of Defense. PPI president Will Marshall, a long-time ally of the “Israel Lobby,” has criticized what he calls Hagel’s “instinctual recoiling from intervention.”

-

The Project for the New American Century, a letterhead group closely associated with the American Enterprise Institute, served as the cornerstone of a neoconservative-led campaign to promote the 2003 invasion of Iraq, helping unite key figures from various ideological factions behind the cause. By 2006, as the United States became increasingly bogged down in a bloody counterinsurgency war in Iraq, the group phased out most operations. Its various directors and supporters, however, remain active today, particularly in the effort to push for war against Iran.

-

The Project on Transitional Democracies, a successor group to the U.S. Committee on NATO, promotes reforms in post-Soviet states and has pressed a get-tough line on Russia.

-

Réalité-EU is a hawkish policy outfit that promotes aggressive European policies toward Iran and other “threats” in the Middle East. The group purports to be based in London, but investigations by progressive blogs have suggested that the group is linked with The Israel Project, a neoconservative-leaning “pro-Israel” advocacy group based in Washington, D.C. The organization’s website no longer lists a London address, but it continues to churn out hawkish analyses and policy recommendations aimed at European policymakers.

-

The Republican Jewish Coalition is a central component of the Republican Party’s outreach to Jewish voters and, increasingly, a source of organizational muscle for Republican campaigns. It has placed itself at the center of a high-profile campaign—funded in large part by casino magnate Sheldon Adelson—to woo Jewish swing-state voters away from the Democratic Party, primarily by exploiting concerns about Israeli security.

-

The Scaife Foundations are a quartet of conservative foundations—the Sarah Scaife, the Carthage, the Allegheny, and the Scaife Family—that have served as the primary vehicles for the...

-

An allegedly bipartisan advocacy group, Secure America Now has been heavily criticized for releasing misleading ads and opinion polls pushing a hawkish agenda on Iran and a “pro-Israel” line in Washington.

-

Although often associated with the passel of foundations that buttress the American right-wing—including, among others, the Scaife, Castle Rock, and Bradley foundations—the Smith...

-

The Society of Americans for National Existence is an anti-Muslim advocacy group that has spearheaded efforts to get U.S. states to pass laws criminalizing sharia law.

-

The now-defunct internet magazine Tech Central Station served as a platform for advocates of militarist U.S. foreign policies, and is now published as TCSDaily on the website of the conservative TV program, Ideas in Action.

-

Under it new head, former AIPAC spokesperson Josh Block, The Israel Project has moved away from the global focus it maintained under its former president and toward a more parochial, Washington-centric approach. "There exists today," Block said shortly after taking over the organization, "a well-coordinated and financed, albeit fringe, echo chamber of organizations and individuals ranging from anti-Zionist conspiracists and apologists for Iran, and [for] terrorists like Hamas and Hezbollah, to anti-Israel advocates and those hypocritically and relentlessly critical of Israel, seeking to spread and mainstream distortions and misinformation in pursuit of their misguided and often hostile agenda."

-

This Brussels-based organization, founded by the American Jewish Committee, has served as an outlet for neoconservative advocacy in Europe.

-

Since the election of President Obama, this neocon-aligned advocacy group has endeavored to paint itself as a centrist organization, “just the ultimate lobbyists and powerbrokers for a Free and Democratic Lebanon.”

-

Founded to push for the expansion of NATO after the end of the Cold War, the U.S. Committee on NATO was a neoconservative-led initiative closely tied to key Republican Party figures.

-

The “nonpartisan” UN Watch, which devotes most of its energy to lambasting UN criticism of Israel, has counted on the financial support of the American Jewish Committee, the Becker Foundation, and a handful of other private donors in recent years.

-

United against Nuclear Iran is a bipartisan pressure group that aims to foil Iran’s purported “ambition to become a regional super-power possessing nuclear weapons,” chiefly by pressuring corporations to stop doing business with Iran and by developing model sanctions legislation for congressional hawks. Despite the election of moderate Hassan Rouhani in Iran and UANI’s recent decision to tap former Obama arms control adviser Gary Samore as its president, the organization has continued to employ confrontational rhetoric.

-

The Washington Free Beacon is a news and commentary site published by the right-wing Center for American Freedom. Modeling itself after liberal blogs like Think Progress, the Beacon has developed a reputation for personal attacks and sensationalistic headlines, often hyping neoconservative narratives. The Beacon's "tabloid-style" coverage led one columnist to lambast the site as "a down-market version of the Weekly Standard."

-

An offshoot of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the influential Washington Institute for Near East Policy has been a centerpiece of the “Israel Lobby” for decades. The group’s scholars advocate an Israel-centric U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East coupled with an aggressive, interventionist approach to neighboring regimes. In one recent public event, the group’s research director appeared to suggest that the United States manufacture a situation that would require Washington to take military action against Iran in the event that negotiations over its nuclear program failed.

-

The Weekly Standard is the flagship journal of neoconservative opinion and activism.

-

Established in Baltimore in 1897, the Zionist Organization of America (ZOA) is the oldest Zionist organization in the United States. Facing declining membership in a crowded “pro-Israel” Washington establishment, ZOA has attempted to rejuvenate itself by staking out hardline positions on Iran, Egypt, and the Occupied Palestinian Territories. The ostensibly nonpartisan group’s rightward drift has increasingly linked it exclusively to the Republican Party, as evidenced by a slate of awards it gave last year to Michele Bachmann, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, and Glenn Beck. However, the group was forced to cancel its annual fundraising gala this year as a result of losing its tax-exempt status after failing to file financial disclosures for three consecutive years.

Share RightWeb

Featured Profiles

For media inquiries,
email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
or call 202-234-9382.

From the Wires

April, 22 2014

As the U.S. attempts to reassure its allies in Asia of its longstanding security commitments in the wake of Russia’s annexation of Crimea, some Asian leaders—such as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe—are making provocative gestures toward their rivals, complicating Washington’s balancing act between containing China and engaging it.


April, 17 2014

Sen. Mark Kirk, the strongly hawkish Republican from Illinois who has accused the State Department of playing politics by negotiating with Iran, has grown increasingly strident in his support for Israel as campaign donations from “pro-Israel” groups has ballooned.


April, 15 2014

A recent resolution passed by the European Parliament promoting renewed engagement between Iran and the EU has angered Iran because it scrutinizes Tehran's human rights record and calls on EU diplomats to meet with Iranian dissidents.


April, 13 2014

A new book argues that President Harry Truman, the U.S. president who first recognized the state of Israel, was skeptical of a Jewish-led state, preferring instead a joint Jewish-Arab federation in Palestine.


April, 09 2014

In its report on GOP mega-donor Paul Singer's financial support for gay rights causes, the Washington Post neglected to mention Singer's potentially greater support for hardline neoconservative foreign policy outfits.


April, 07 2014

Although Palestinians have sought to pressure Israel by applying for membership in a host of international organizations, they have so far refrained from joining the International Criminal Court, which would enable them to bring war crimes cases against Israel.


April, 01 2014

Israeli-Palestinian peace talks may serve the interests of political leaders in Washington, Ramallah, and Tel Aviv, but they appear doomed to failure.


RightWeb
share