Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Mideast Hegemony Blowback; the “Theocons”; and Santorum is Back

Print Friendly

FEATURED ARTICLES

Is Washington Being Sidelined in the Mideast?
By Leon Hadar | February 20, 2007

When U.S. officials warn of the chaos that would follow a U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, they are actually expressing their anxiety over their real nightmare scenario—a Middle East in which the United States is marginalized to a position of little power. But they seem to have found a solution: Attacking Iran. Read full story.

America’s Crusaders
By Tom Barry | February 23, 2007

A fervent blend of ideology and faith is spurring various factions of the American right to champion an imperial foreign policy that envisions the United States forever at war. Read full story.

NEW RIGHT WEB PROFILES—”THE THEOCONS”

Michael Novak
Novak, a so-called theocon who champions the idea that unrestrained capitalism aids social justice, has been a vocal proponent of the Iraq War and a critic of U.S. editors, whom he accuses of spreading enemy propaganda.

Richard John Neuhaus
The former activist pastor, who has the ear of the president, argues for a new containment strategy to deter radical Islam.

George Weigel
A senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and an early neocon trailblazer, Weigel argues that some Pentagon planners reflect Christian just-war principles better than U.S. bishops.

Institute on Religion and Democracy
One of a number of so-called Christian Reconstructionist groups, the neocon-aligned IRD fights the culture wars at home while supporting U.S. wars abroad.

Institute on Religion and Public Life
Established in 1989 by hardline “theocon” Richard Neuhaus, the IRPL bridges the divide between the neoconservatives and the Christian Right. It also publishes the religious journal First Things.

Ethics and Public Policy Center
Part of a web of religious-oriented policy institutes supporting neoconservative social and foreign policies, the EPPC’s newest program aims to warn the public of America’s growing list of enemies, with one of America’s leading far-right conservatives at the helm.

Rick Santorum
Santorum, a former Republican senator from Pennsylvania and a champion of right-wing social policies while in office, is the latest addition to the Ethics and Pubic Policy Center’s slate of conservative scholars and fellows, heading the center’s newly created “America’s Enemies” program.

SEE ALSO

Right Web Profile: Elliott Abrams
A former president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, Abrams abetted the illegal effort to aid the Nicaraguan Contras during the Reagan presidency and today serves as a key member of the George W. Bush administration’s plank of Mideast ideologues intent on reshaping the region.

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

A Tale of Two Interventions
By Jim Lobe | February 20, 2007

The neocons beat the drums loudly for invading Iraq; their approach on Iran is far quieter and unfocused, yet should not be disregarded. Read full story.

LETTERS

IRC encourages feedback and comments. Send letters to rightweb@irc-online.org. IRC reserves the right to edit comments for clarity and brevity. Be sure to include your full name. Thank you.

IRC Global Good Neighbor Initiative

The initiative to promote a global good neighbor ethic as the guiding vision of U.S. foreign policy was launched by the International Relations Center (IRC) in May 2005 with events in New York City and Washington, DC. Consider adding your voice to the cause. And check out this new GGN video.

If you would like to see our variety of free ezines and listservs, please go to: http://www.irc-online.org/lists/.
To be removed from this list, please email rightweb@irc-online.org with “unsubscribe Right Web.”

Share RightWeb

Featured Profiles

Former Sen. Jim Talent (R-MO), a stalwart advocate of Pentagon spending now based at the right-wing Heritage Foundation, says he would have voted for the Iraq War even if he had known the Bush administration’s claims about WMDs were false.


Mike Pompeo (R-KS) is a conservative Republican congressman who was voted into office as part of the “tea party” surge in 2011 and nominated by Donald Trump to be director of the CIA.


Although better known for his domestic platform promoting “limited” government, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) has expressed strong sympathies for projecting U.S. military power abroad.


James “Mad Dog” Mattis is a retired U.S Marine Corps general and combat veteran who served as commander of U.S. Central Command during 2010-2013 before being removed by the Obama administration reportedly because of differences over Iran policy.


Sen. Mark Kirk (R-IL) was one of Congress’s staunchest foreign policy hawks and a “pro-Israel” hardliner.


A self-styled terrorism “expert” who claims that the killing of Osama bin Laden strengthened Al Qaeda, former right-wing Lebanese militia member Walid Phares wildly claims that the Obama administration gave the Muslim Brotherhood “the green light” to sideline secular Egyptians.


Weekly Standard editor and PNAC cofounder Bill Kristol is a longtime neoconservative activist and Washington political operative.


For media inquiries,
email rightwebproject@gmail.com

From the Wires

Print Friendly

Spurred by anti-internationalist sentiment among conservative Republicans in Congress and the Trump administration, the US is headed for a new confrontation with the UN over who decides how much the US should pay for peacekeeping.


Print Friendly

Decent developments in the Trump administration indicate that the neoconservatives, at one point on the margins of Washington’s new power alignments, are now on the ascendent?


Print Friendly

As the end of Donald Trump’s first 100 days as president approaches, it seems that his version of an “America-first” foreign policy is in effect a military-first policy aimed at achieving global hegemony, which means it’s a potential doomsday machine.


Print Friendly

Hopeful that Donald Trump may actually be their kind of guy, neoconservatives are full of praise for the cruise-missile strike against Syria and are pressing for more.


Print Friendly

Steve Bannon’s removal from the NSC’s Principals Committee doesn’t mean that he’s gone from the White House or no longer exerts a powerful influence on Trump. His office is still located very close to the Oval Office, and there’s nothing to indicate that his dark and messianic worldview has changed.


Print Friendly

Promoting sanctions that could undermine the Iran nuclear deal, pushing security assistance for Israel, combatting BDS, and more.


Print Friendly

Contrary to some wishful thinking following the Trump administration’s decision to “put Iran on notice” and seemingly restore U.S.-Saudi ties, there are little signs of apprehension in Tehran.


RightWeb
share