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Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Giuliani’s War; The Bingo Connection; JINSA and Friends; "Proxy Armies"?

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FEATURED ARTICLE

Religious Right Rejects Giuliani
By Bill Berkowitz | May 24, 2007

Republican presidential candidates seem to be fighting a losing battle in their efforts to talk tough on Iraq while sidelining core conservative domestic issues, and foreign policy in the broader Middle East is emerging as a campaign catch. Not to mention that powerful figures on the Religious Right are now trumpeting the same arguments as neoconservatives regarding regime change in Iran. Read full story.

FEATURED PROFILES

Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs
A core element of the right-wing of the U.S. pro-Israel lobby, JINSA specializes in fomenting U.S.-Israeli military-to-military relations while promoting a hardline on Mideast peace, pushing for an expansive war on terror, and advocating controversial weapons programs.

Irving Moskowitz
A California bingo magnate, Moskowitz uses cash from his gambling business to fund a host of neoconservative outfits in the United States, including JINSA, as well as the Israeli settler movement in the Occupied Territories.

Michael Ledeen
Ledeen, a "Freedom Scholar" at the American Enterprise Institute and former JINSA director, gets the "heebie-jeebies" when he hears the word "stability," frets about the negative impact of peace, and promotes a never-ending war against the "terror masters."

Shoshana Bryen
An advocate of U.S. interventionism and supporter of a Likud line on Mideast policy, Bryen is the former executive director of JINSA.

Stephen Bryen
The president of the controversial defense contractor Finmeccanica, Inc. and an associate of leading neoconservative ideologues, Stephen Bryen is also the former head of JINSA and adviser to the Center for Security Policy.

Mark Broxmeyer
Broxmeyer, a New York real estate entrepreneur, is one of two self-made magnates heading JINSA, an influential inside-the-Beltway group that advocates U.S.-Israeli "strategic cooperation" and an expansive war on terror.

Norman Hascoe
The president of the powerful Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs has also been one of its major donors.

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

Creating "Proxy Armies"?
By Eli Clifton

Proposed legislation would allow the Pentagon to give millions in military aid to foreign governments that have shady human rights records to help fight the "war on terror." Read full story.

Right Web Profile: Michael O’Hanlon
A Democrat based at the centrist Brookings Institution, O’Hanlon has lately been a fellow traveler with the neocon crowd, a fact demonstrated by his support of the "surge" in Iraq.

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