Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Getting Africa Wrong; The Bush Breakdown; The Wolfowitz-Zoellick Two-Step

FEATURED ARTICLES

The Right Gets Africa Wrong
By Conn Hallinan

Africa plans pushed by outfits like the Heritage Foundation and instituted by the Bush administration reveal an agenda aimed at securing oil interests while extending the war on terror to a new continent. But observers in and outside Africa see an agenda that repeats the same mistakes of the past. Read full story.

Putting Friends in High Places
By Tom Barry

President Bush’s decision to back Robert Zoellick as Paul Wolfowitz’s replacement at the World Bank served two purposes: making sure a loyalist led the powerful multilateral institution, and continuing the trend of putting U.S. interests at the Bank ahead of those of the rest of the world. Read full story.

FEATURED PROFILES

Heritage Foundation
A mainstay of the conservative movement for over three decades, the Heritage Foundation has lately taken to hawking the "Islamofascist" threat while pushing an indefinite U.S. intervention in Iraq.

Hillel Fradkin
Fradkin, a noted Straussian scholar, senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, and longtime fellow traveler of the neocons, hears the threatening echoes of the distant past in the words of America’s "enemies."

Paul Wolfowitz
The controversial former Pentagon official and ex-president of the World Bank has followed other erstwhile Bush administration officials, including John Bolton, to the American Enterprise Institute.

Robert Zoellick
The former U.S. trade rep and supporter of the Project for the New American Century, Zoellick began his new job as head of the World Bank this month.

ALSO NEW ON RIGHT WEB

The Bush Breakdown
By Jim Lobe

On everything from domestic policy to the Iraq War, an increasing number of Republicans and members of the public are abandoning the president and the vice president. Read full story.

LETTERS

Re: Khody Akhavi, " The Media War," Right Web, June 28, 2007

Khody Akhavi’s review of neoconservative efforts to take over U.S. government information sources in "The Media War" (Right Web, June 28, 2007) was concise and very informative. The neoconservatives’ myopically narrow worldview and their imperialistic solutions for the world’s problems presented without counterpoint will not serve our country’s better interests because the world’s listeners are capable of distinguishing truthful information from propaganda. Unadulterated and dishonest, propaganda discredits both the source and the message.

Similarly, however, al-Hurra’s broadcast of Hassan Nasrallah’s speech should have been accompanied by a thoughtful critique by someone with expert credentials. Considering Hassan Nasrallah represents only 3-4 in 10 Lebanese (although he seemingly believes he represents everyone in Lebanon but [Prime Minister Fouad] Siniora and his family) and has his own narrow worldview and imperial solutions for the problems he perceives, he’s hardly an impartial speaker—he is his own, best, propagandist. Likewise, considering the storm of protest and outrage in the Arab media in response to Iran’s "Holocaust Conference," failure to honestly report that rejection of Iran’s actions was similarly dishonest—as though America would not take issue with Holocaust denial.

That [former al-Hurra director Larry] Register was too naïve to realize what was happening under his nose is not to his credit, and Mr. Akhavi’s description of these omissions as "attempts to appeal to an Arab audience" are similarly misleading. They weren’t that, and characterizing the uncontested broadcast of extremist Arab positions as an American position misleads the audience regarding the values America’s information broadcasts should be trying to communicate. Again, unadulterated and dishonest propaganda discredits both the source and the message.

Rael Nidess, M.D.
Marshall, TX

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Featured Profiles

Lindsey Graham (R-SC) is one of the Senate’s more vocal hawks, and one of the prime vacillators among Republicans between objecting to and supporting Donald Trump.


Ron Dermer is the Israeli ambassador to the United States and has deep connections to the Republican Party and the neoconservative movement.


The Washington-based American Enterprise Institute is a rightist think tank with a broad mandate covering a range of foreign and domestic policy issues that is known for its strong connections to neoconservatism and overseas debacles like the Iraq War.


Max Boot, neoconservative military historian at the Council on Foreign Relations, on Trump and Russia: “At every turn Trump is undercutting the ‘get tough on Russia’ message because he just can’t help himself, he just loves Putin too much.”


Since taking office Donald Trump has revealed an erratic and extremely hawkish approach to U.S. foreign affairs, which has been marked by controversial actions like dropping out of the Iran nuclear agreement that have raised tensions across much of the world and threatened relations with key allies.


Mike Huckabee, a former governor of Arkansas and an evangelical pastor, is a far-right pundit known for his hawkish policies and opposition to an Israeli peace deal with the Palestinians.


Nikki Haley, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, is known for her lock-step support for Israel and considered by some to be a future presidential candidate.


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From the Wires

The Trumpian new regional order in the Middle East is predicated on strongman rule, disregard for human rights, Sunni primacy over Iran and other Shia centers of power, continued military support for pro-American warring parties regardless of the unlawfulness of such wars, and Israeli hegemony.


A comparison of U.S. nuclear diplomacy with Iran and the current version with North Korea puts the former in a good light and makes the latter look disappointing. Those with an interest in curbing the dangers of proliferating nuclear weapons should hope that the North Korea picture will improve with time. But whether it does or not, the process has put into perspective how badly mistaken was the Trump administration’s trashing of the Iran nuclear agreement.


Numerous high profile Trump administration officials maintain close ties with anti-Muslim conspiracy theorists. In today’s America, disparaging Islam is acceptable in ways that disparaging other religions is not. Given the continuing well-funded campaigns by the Islamophobes and continuing support from their enablers in the Trump administration, starting with the president himself, it seems unlikely that this trend will be reversed any time soon.


The Trump administration’s nuclear proliferation policy is now in meltdown, one which no threat of “steely resolve”—in Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s words—will easily contain. It is hemorrhaging in part because the administration has yet to forge a strategy that consistently and credibly signals a feasible bottom line that includes living with—rather than destroying—regimes it despises or fears. Political leaders on both sides of the aisle must call for a new model that has some reasonable hope of restraining America’s foes and bringing security to its Middle East allies.


Congressional midterm elections are just months away and another presidential election already looms. Who will be the political leader with the courage and presence of mind to declare: “Enough! Stop this madness!” Man or woman, straight or gay, black, brown, or white, that person will deserve the nation’s gratitude and the support of the electorate. Until that occurs, however, the American penchant for war will stretch on toward infinity.


To bolster the president’s arguments for cutting back immigration, the administration recently released a fear-mongering report about future terrorist threats. Among the potential threats: a Sudanese national who, in 2016, “pleaded guilty to attempting to provide material support to ISIS”; an Uzbek who “posted a threat on an Uzbek-language website to kill President Obama in an act of martyrdom on behalf of ISIS”; a Syrian who, in a plea agreement, “admitted that he knew a member of ISIS and that while in Syria he participated in a battle against the Syrian regime, including shooting at others, in coordination with Al Nusrah,” an al-Qaeda offshoot.


The recent appointment of purveyors of anti-Muslim rhetoric to the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom exposes the cynical approach Republicans have taken in promoting religious freedom.


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