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Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

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Bill Schneider is a former CNN political analyst currently based at Third Way, a Wall Street-linked Democratic think tank.

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The National Interest is a realist-leaning foreign policy magazine founded by Irving Kristol and later taken over by the Nixon Center.

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The Weekly Standard is the flagship journal of neoconservative opinion and activism.

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The Washington Free Beacon is a news site published by the right-wing Center for American Freedom.

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Conservative journalist and diplomat best known for his prediction, made just before the stock market dropped, that the Dow Jones was on the verge of a tremendous upsurge, James Glassman is a former American Enterprise Institute fellow who hosts the TV show Ideas in Action and directs the George W. Bush Institute.

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Andrew Walworth is TV producer who served as executive producer of Ideas in Action, a weekly TV program hosted by James Glassman and produced by the George W. Bush Institute and Grace Creek Media.

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The erstwhile media mogul and conservative writer, Black was recently released from prison—after serving just over two years of his six-year sentence for fraud convictions—as a result of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that limited the effect of a federal fraud law.

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The new owner of neocon mouthpiece the Weekly Standard is an Evangelical business tycoon whose media holdings provide a powerful voice for his rightwing views on taxes, national security, and family values.

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Philip Merrill, a minor media mogul and former president of the U.S. Export-Import Bank, was found dead in the Chesapeake Bay in late June 2006, apparently the victim of a self-inflicted gunshot…

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Brigette Gabriel, an anti-Islamic author and activist, is the founder of the right-wing group ACT! for America.


The American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), one of the more effective U.S. lobbying outfits, aims to ensure that the United States backs Israel regardless of the policies Israel pursues.


Frank Gaffney, director of the hardline neoconservative Center for Security Policy, is a longtime advocate of aggressive U.S. foreign policies, bloated military budgets, and confrontation with the Islamic world.


Shmuley Boteach is a “celebrity rabbi” known for his controversial “pro-Israel” advocacy.


United against Nuclear Iran is a pressure group that attacks companies doing business in Iran and disseminates alarmist reports about the country’s nuclear program.


Huntsman, the millionaire scion of the Huntsman chemical empire, is a former Utah governor who served as President Obama’s first ambassador to China and was a candidate for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination.


Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) is one the Senate’s more ardent supporters of militaristic U.S. foreign policies.


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From the Wires

AIPAC has done more than just tolerate the U.S. tilt toward extreme and often xenophobic views. Newly released tax filings show that the country’s biggest pro-Israel group financially contributed to the Center for Security Policy, the think-tank that played a pivotal role in engineering the Trump administration’s efforts to impose a ban on Muslim immigration.


It would have been hard for Trump to find someone with more extreme positions than David Friedman for U.S. ambassador to Israel.


Just as the “bogeyman” of the Mexican rapist and drug dealer is used to justify the Wall and mass immigration detention, the specter of Muslim terrorists is being used to validate gutting the refugee program and limiting admission from North Africa, and Southwest and South Asia.


Although the mainstream media narrative about Trump’s Russia ties has been fairly linear, in reality the situation appears to be anything but.


Reagan’s military buildup had little justification, though the military was rebuilding after the Vietnam disaster. Today, there is almost no case at all for a defense budget increase as big as the $54 billion that the Trump administration wants.


The very idea of any U.S. president putting his personal financial interests ahead of the U.S. national interest is sufficient reason for the public to be outraged. That such a conflict of interest may affect real U.S. foreign policy decisions is an outrage.


The new US administration is continuing a state of war that has existed for 16 years.


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