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Right Web

Tracking militarists’ efforts to influence U.S. foreign policy

Feature Stories


The Attack-Syria Coalition: Then and Now

The ongoing crisis in Syria has become a litmus test for Bush-era neoconservatives, as well as the larger interventionist coalition that pushed for the Iraq War under the banner of the Project for the New American Century. Just as we saw during the years preceding the invasion of Iraq, the emergence of a pro-intervention coalition is occurring in the absence of a serious discussion about the complexity of the circumstances surrounding Syria’s spiraling civil war, the challenges inherent in any outside military engagement, and the dangers of a zero-sum approach to the conflict.


The Hardliners Have Romney’s Ear

Although he has developed a reputation for ideological flexibility, Mitt Romney’s campaign rhetoric on foreign policy seems calibrated to allow him the least possible amount of breathing room if he were to become president—a trend that is buttressed by a slate of hawkish advisers who have apparently marginalized the more moderate voices in the candidate’s circle. Romney obviously believes that a hawkish approach provides the best antidote to President Obama’s foreign policy record. If he’s right, it may prove difficult to tack back to a more responsible foreign policy once he’s in the Oval Office.


Will Israeli Dissent Halt the March towards War?

Tensions have been reaching near fevered pitch over Iran’s nuclear program as Israeli leaders and their supporters in the United States have pressed for military action to prevent Tehran from developing nuclear weapons. However, a number of factors have been working against the hawks, including recent progress at the P5+1 talks and the lack of enthusiasm for another conflict among a war-weary U.S. public. In recent weeks, a new force has emerged that seems to have made the threat of war even less imminent—the unprecedented wave of dissent from current and former top Israeli officials.


The Militarization of the Syrian Uprising

As pressure mounts to arm rebels in Syria, there is need for a sober assessment of the costs and consequences of the increasing militarization of the conflict there. If history is any guide, a foreign-backed armed rebellion will likely not produce the kind of victory—or engender the kind of support—that the anti-Assad fighters will require to usher in a new Syria. Additionally, there is the very real possibility that many of the rebels—as we’ve seen in Libya—will turn out to be little better than the regime they seek to replace.


Obama to Pro-Israel Lobby Group: ‘Too Much Loose Talk of War’

Before a skeptical audience of delegates from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, President Obama affirmed U.S-Israeli ties and challenged detractors to impugn his administration’s record of support for the Jewish state. However, while insisting that that the United States would consider military options in the event of Iran’s developing a nuclear weapon, he also warned Israeli allies of “loose talk” about war, which Obama said only empowers the Iranian regime and decreases prospects for a diplomatic solution.


Whither the Liberal Hawks?

Tehran’s threat to close the Strait of Hormuz, coupled with mounting threats from hawks in Israel and the United States, has brought the possibility of war sharply into view. But a number of influential members of the U.S. foreign policy establishment—including several prominent liberal interventionists who supported the invasion of Iraq—are warning against further escalation.


Rise of the Vulcans Redux

The purported “end of the neocon consensus” has hardly meant an end to hawkishness in the GOP fold. With the Republican candidates virtually all gunning for Iran, backing right-wing Israeli policies toward the Palestinians, and stabling a passel of neoconservative advisers (Ron Paul excepted), voters have plenty of clues about what the foreign policy of a new GOP administration would look like. And while some of the candidates have expressed wariness with neoconservative notions of armed democracy promotion, all the signs indicate that if a Republican wins next year, we will likely be in for a bit if George W. redux.


Turning the Tide on the “Pro-Israel” Debate

With key members of the “Israel Lobby” acknowledging the importance of providing a broader space to Israel’s critics, the indelibly beltway Politico recognizing the influence of such critics in a full-length feature, and core Democratic organizations showing an increasing sensitivity to inappropriate uses of the anti-Semite charge, is the United States finally willing to undertake a real debate on what are the best U.S. interests in the Middle East?


The China Divide and the Future of the GOP

The issue of whither U.S. relations with China is an important test case for observing the divide between the free market and neoconservative wings of the Republican Party. Thus far, the GOP presidential candidates have largely failed to articulate a vision of China that comes anywhere close to reflecting the complexity of U.S.-Chinese relations. Among the leading candidates, Mitt Romney has arguably been the most aggressive in his discussion of China policy. Yet, his embrace of a hawkish line towards Beijing would appear to indicate that President Obama’s would-be challengers have not yet found an alternative vocabulary for talking and thinking about one of the critical foreign policy issues of the 2012 election. It seems clear that even though neoconservatives lack grassroots support, they offer what is effectively the only option for an “establishment” GOP candidate, a fact that could have lasting impact both on the viability of any Republican Party foreign policy platform as well as future U.S. decision-making vis-à-vis other hotspots like Iran, Israel, and North Korea.


A Silver Lining for Palestine?

Since Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’s call for an independent Palestinian state at the UN General Assembly in September, the mood in Washington towards the Palestinians has turned increasingly hostile. Led by the likes of Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), hawkish “pro-Israel” policymakers and pundits have been pushing for an end to U.S. aid to the Palestinian Authority in an effort to punish it. But the steady erosion of Israel’s international legitimacy, combined with diminishing U.S. influence in the region, could well lead to an eventual solution, particularly if this situation forces Israel to loosen its iron grip on the Palestinian territories and participate in meaningful dialogue.


Boxed in on the Middle East

President Obama’s decision to come out against the Palestinian bid for statehood at the UN General Assembly this week might have spelled an end to four-decades of U.S. leadership on Middle East peace. Boxed in by the Palestinians and the surging international support for their cause, Obama is also facing tremendous pressure at home, where presidential-election politics threaten to further drive the United States into isolation in its one-sided support for Israel. Leading the charge is Texas Governor Rick Perry, the Republican presidential candidate who claimed at a press conference earlier in the week that “help is on the way” and that his Christian faith gives him “clear directive to support Israel.” Such faith apparently does not include giving moral support to the Palestinians, whom Perry equated with “orchestrators of terrorism.”


New Report Identifies Organisational Nexus of Islamophobia

In a ground-breaking new report, the Center for American Progress reveals the small group of inter-connected foundations, think tanks, pundits, and bloggers that has been behind a decades-long campaign to promote fear of Islam and Muslims in the United States. The report, “Fear, Inc.: The Roots of the Islamophobia Network in America,” identifies seven foundations that have quietly provided a total of more than $42 million to individuals and organisations that have spearheaded the anti-Islam campaign. They include funders that have long been associated with the extreme right, as well as several family foundations that have supported right-wing and settler groups in Israel. The network also includes what the report calls “misinformation experts,” such as Frank Gaffney of the Center for Security Policy, Daniel Pipes of Middle East Forum, Steven Emerson of the Investigative Project on Terrorism, David Yerushalmi of the Society of Americans for National Existence, and Robert Spencer of Stop Islamization of America–all of whom often appear on national TV news networks and right-wing radio shows to comment on Islam and its alleged threat to U.S. national security.


The Saudi Counter-Revolution

Tunisia, Egypt, now Libya. Each of these revolutions have occurred under the watchful eye of the House of Saud, which has sought to stifle change and suffocate democratic aspirations in the Arab world. While the United States appears to have viewed Saudi machinations as serving its interests in the short term, there can be little doubt that U.S. acquiescence to Saudi interests will have serious implications down the road. At a watershed political moment, the United States has failed to act in accordance with its own principles, and thus could lose the respect and cooperation of yet another generation of Arabs. The potential fallout from these mistakes could haunt U.S. policy for decades to come.


The Paranoid Style of Anti-Islamism

Anders Behring Breivik’s hateful rhetoric is part of a larger right-wing trend demonizing Islam. This kind of discourse, as Richard Hofstadter pointed out in his classic The Paranoid Style in American Politics, views the purported enemy as “being totally evil and totally unappeasable,” thus requiring its utter elimination, “if not from the world, at least from the theater of operations to which the paranoid directs his attention.” America has seen this kind of phenomenon before, with McCarthyism and the Ku Klux Klan, both of which emerged at times during which the United States was confronted with the limits of its power. To understand the likes of Anders Breivik, we must look beyond the American anti-Muslim bloggers who schooled him, and begin to ask what in U.S. politics and society has nurtured these purveyors of hate and paranoia in the first place.


The Narco-Terror War

Despite vocal efforts by some foreign policy hawks to view the war on drugs as an extension of the war on terror, the emerging consensus—even among the political establishment—is that the war on drugs has been a dismal failure. Drug production—and body counts—surge in Latin America, opium is a staple crop in Afghanistan despite the presence of tens of thousands of occupying troops, and anti-drug policies that have helped put hundreds of thousands of non-violent offenders behind bars have had no discernible impact on usage. But for much of the rightwing establishment, drug prohibition is just like any other war: deserving of uncritical support even in the face of defeat.


Enhanced Embellishment Techniques

A number of conservatives and security hawks have used the death of Osama bin Laden as a prop in their public relations war on behalf of torture. Despite evidence to the contrary, these pundits and “experts”—led by a passel of former Bush administration officials—allege that without “enhanced interrogation techniques” bin Laden would still be living and that Barack Obama’s efforts to stop the use of torture have endangered the United States. But their claims have amounted to little more than an embellishment of the historical record and a distortion of the real impact of torture on U.S. policy and security.


Whose Nation-State Exactly?

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s demand that Israel be recognized as a “Jewish state” is unprecedented in the history of Israeli-Palestinian negotiations. Rooted in a nineteenth century European-nationalist worldview, the concept has been officially opposed by the United States, and with good reason—it goes against basic principles of international law and has served to undermine efforts to negotiate a lasting Middle East peace.


Cakewalk to (Baghdad) Tehran

Just as they did in their effort to push for war in Iraq, hawks are assiduously laying the groundwork for their campaign to push for a U.S. attack on Iran. Although taking cues from the same playbook they used after 9/11, thus far the war campaigners have yet to see all the necessary pieces fall into place for a successful crusade. But theirs is a long game, and we would be severely remiss if we failed to acknowledge that the hawks are preparing themselves to take advantage of any crisis or significant political change to push through their agenda.


Palestine, the Arab Spring, and the Middle East Lobby

As the Arab Spring confronts increasing resistance from entrenched interests in the region, the Palestinian cause appears to be at best a fading concern of demonstrators—or so “pro-Israel” ideologues would have us believe. But this myth of a divide between Arab demonstrators and Palestinians does not stand up to the evidence. And just as importantly, it fails to take into account that what we are witnessing across the Arab world is a broad-based movement aimed at asserting democratic rights and undermining the grip of hegemonic forces in the region, and that nowhere is the need for this movement more acute than in Palestine.


Is It Palestine’s Turn?

The Palestinian people — and the rest of the world — have begun to realize that even an iron fist can only maintain its grip for so long. And yet, despite the widespread anger that led to the fall of the Mubarak regime in Egypt, western powers are busily building its counterpart in the West Bank. Palestinian anger has become larger and more coordinated than many expected, and its “Mubarak moment” may be very close at hand. If the Arab revolutions empower Palestinians to build a mass movement for independence, and if the new Arab governments push Israel’s neighbors to play a more active role in the Palestinian struggle, then Israeli regional hegemony could be significantly compromised.


Commentary Smears Right Web

Commentary Magazine’s Contentions blog recently published an entry from Michael Rubin, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, in which he attacked Right Web for employing standards “embraced by conspiracy theorists like the LaRouchies, 9/11 revisionists, and Birthers.” He also criticized Right Web’s director and editor on the basis of a stark mischaracterization of a correspondence between the two from November 2009 and called on Congress to investigate PBS Frontline for publishing stories that provide links to Right Web material.


A “Mullah-Caudillo Axis”?

Ties between Latin America and the Middle East have drawn renewed attention, in part spurred by the tepid reactions of Latin American leaders to the deteriorating situation in Libya. But the main concern, at least among rightwing observers, is what the American Enterprise Institute unimaginatively terms the “Mullah-Caudillo Axis.” The relationship between Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadenijad is causing extreme handwringing on the right, spurring pundits to conjure fantastical scenarios about Iran exploiting America’s “soft underbelly.” Clearly, neoconservatives haven’t given up hope of attacking Iran—even if they have to go through Caracas to do it.


Iran’s Bizarro “Green Movement”

During the recent upheavals across the Greater Middle East, the various iterations of the neoconservative line—the optimistic pro-democracy, the paranoid Islamophobic, or the brazen combination of both—have all tended to share a single major fallacy: That the opposition movement in Iran, the so-called Green movement, is a movement that seeks the same goals as the neoconservatives and their allies. However, this embrace of a fantastical Iranian opposition reveals more about its promoters’ pathological fears than it does about the realities in Iran.


Neoconservative Redux with Libya

In a distinct echo of the tactics they pursued to encourage U.S. intervention in the Balkans and Iraq, a familiar clutch of neoconservatives appealed last Friday for the United States and NATO to “immediately” prepare military action to help bring down the regime of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.


A Middle East Déjà Vu

Though the recent uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt were unprecedented in the history of the modern Arab world, they are not altogether new to the Middle East. Similar events occurred in Iran in the 1950s, and the subsequent overthrow of its democratically elected government by the United States provides a chilling example of how western involvement in Middle East social change can produce disastrous long-term consequences. As Wael Ghonim, the now-famous Google executive arrested for helping plan the initial demonstrations, has written: “Dear Western Governments, You’ve been silent for 30 years supporting the regime that was oppressing us. Please don’t get involved now.”


Whither the Party Line on Egypt?

The neoconservatives have repeatedly found themselves facing the discomforting reality that democratic change in the Middle East—which they have at times feverishly embraced—has led to governments that are opposed to Israel. Now, with the Egyptian street in upheaval, a stark divide has emerged in neocon discourse. The freedom crowd sees the uprising as vindication of Bush’s “global democratic revolution”; the Islamophobes have begun their predictable fear mongering about the Muslim Brotherhood and the threat of global Islamism.


The Case for Syria

The continuing influence of Syria, which has been reflected in the recent power struggles in Lebanon, clearly demonstrates that U.S. attempts to isolate Damascus have failed. Syria occupies an important strategic position in the Levant, and it sits at the crossroads of a number of U.S. interests. Despite efforts by rightwing “pro-Israel” groups in the United States to prevent rapprochement with Syria, direct and honest engagement is the only way to satisfy U.S. foreign policy goals, rein in violent extremism, and encourage political reforms.


Apostate Politics: How Some Recanted Muslims Have Bolstered Militarist US Policies

Militarist advocacy organizations often employ exiles from Muslim countries to bolster their promotion of hardline U.S. policies. Individuals such as Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Wafa Sultan, and Nonie Darwish have used their perches at neoconservative think tanks to rise to prominence as “apostates” of Islam, speaking out against the religion for its purported backwardness and tendency to violence. Though making generalizations about the cultural predispositions of more than a billion people may be patently absurd, these individuals have provided considerable ammunition to efforts to justify military intervention and other hawkish U.S. policies in the region.


The Real Middle East Lobby

Right-wing supporters of Israel have countered complaints about the influence of the “Israel Lobby” by conjuring a multifarious boogeyman that supposedly has been swaying U.S. policy for decades—the “Arab Lobby.” Purportedly composed of a heady mélange of actors—including Palestinian activists, oil and weapons companies, Middle Eastern dictators, and Arab-Americans—this lobby shares a similar weakness with that of the Israeli version: It misleadingly groups together forces whose intentions are often opposed. The notion also disguises a deeper fault line over U.S. Mideast policy: The real battle is the one pitting the combined forces of hawkish “pro-Israeli” factions and Saudi-led oil interests—both of which advocate a steady flow of weapons and the perpetual presence of U.S. troops—against populist Middle East groups and their Western supporters.


Standard Operating Procedures: How the Neocons Are Co-opting the Tea Party

The midterm elections have been hailed as a victory for the Tea Party, whose anti-establishment revolt seems to have captured the nation’s zeitgeist. However, while much has been written about the impact this new movement will have on U.S. domestic politics, much less has been said about the challenge the Tea Party poses to the militarist foreign policy wing of the conservative establishment. The neoconservatives, however, have taken notice, and they have been busy doing what they do best—endeavoring to co-opt a rival political faction before it becomes a threat. But will the neocons’ stratagems work this time around?


Whose Siberia?

Siberia’s forbidden hinterlands have long been a source of friction between Russia and China. In recent years, the idea that a horde of Asian invaders stands ready to reclaim this land for the Middle Empire has inspired the fevered minds of both right-wing Americans and Russian nationalists. Nevertheless, tensions along the eastern Siberian frontier are just that—tensions. And there is nothing to indicate that Beijing sees a suicidal invasion as preferable to simply buying Siberian resources, and letting the Russians live with isolation, cold, and summer mosquitoes. But then again, conspiratorial minds will always discount the likely explanation in favor of an apocalyptic one.


The Last Summit?

There is little reason to think the recently revived Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations will result in success. Weakened leaders, growing instability in the Middle East, and rapidly changing international conditions will likely conspire to prevent a real and lasting peace. With U.S. geopolitical influence on the wane and the country’s domestic discourse taking a hard right turn, President Obama’s current peace processing could prove to be the last American diplomatic hurrah in the Middle East. What this spells for the future of the Holy Land is hard to predict, but neoconservatives and their Likud comrades will surely be pleased.


The Neoconservative Echo Chamber 2.0

With their strategic goals discredited and their influence in policy circles on the wane, neoconservatives are making savvy use of the internet to promote their hawkish agenda on Iran, terrorism, and Middle East peace. A new generation of young neocons—bloggers and PR specialists—are employing slick websites and web videos to attract populist backing for their foreign policy agenda. The combination of a Democratic administration and growing disaffection among liberal Zionists for the right-wing policies of Israel’s Likud-led government has spurred neoconservatives to shift the focus of their activism from recruiting elite decision-makers to mobilizing the Republican Party’s ultra-conservative base. The implications of this shift, especially in a sooner-than-expected post-Obama era, could have significant repercussions in U.S. relations with the world.


Reactionary Censorship in the UK: The Case of SpinProfiles

SpinProfiles, a UK-based website that monitors the European conservative movement, was recently forced to shut down after Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, a well connected neoconservative based in London who is the son of writer Christopher Hitchens, complained about his profile on the website. According to a director of SpinProfiles, Meleagrou-Hitchens provided no evidence that he was slandered; rather, says David Miller, the incident represents a clear case of spurious censorship that calls into question the state of public debate in Britain. It also highlights the growing neoconservative network across the Atlantic.


The Civilian Control Trap

Conservative acquiescence in the firing of Gen. Stanley McChrystal appears to be a surprising commitment to the principle of civilian control of the military by the American right-wing. On the other hand, it may have presaged a campaign to lay the blame of a failed war in Afghanistan at the feet of a Democratic president. Since 2001, conservatives have strongly supported civilian control, in part because of military queasiness about the war in Iraq.Today, conservatives are using the principle of civilian control to place full responsibility for difficulties in the Afghanistan War on the shoulders of President Obama.


Muscular Nonrationality: Amitai Etzioni and War with Iran

Once described as the “Everything Expert” by Time magazine, Amitai Etzioni, the renowned social scientist and public intellectual based at George Washington University, has in recent years turned his attention to U.S. foreign affairs. Offering at times contradictory views on how to handle perceived threats from North Korean, Russia, and elsewhere, Etzioni’s latest concern is Iran, which he claims will be impervious to nuclear deterrence and thus must be bombed. Mixing his controversial views on “nonrational” state behavior, Israeli security, and “muscular morality,” Etzioni’s discourse has found favor among Israel’s right-wing. But does it make any sense?


“The Surge of Ideas”

In recent years, there has been a growing tendency for think tanks and military brass to jointly pursue policy objectives, some of which are opposed by the public or the White House—take, for example, the campaigns to build support for the troop “surges” in both Iraq and Afghanistan. This trend, say critics, raises important questions about the appropriate role of the military in promoting particular policies and whether there is enough transparency and accountability in the work of policy groups. Should military brass be more circumspect in how they influence public debates? At what point do “non-partisan” wonks cease being non-partisan? And, just as importantly, will there be a new joint campaign aimed at pressuring the Obama administration to delay troop withdrawal from Afghanistan?


The Nuclear Posture Attack

The vehement attacks against President Obama’s arms control initiatives reveal the extent to which the militarist extreme in the Republican Party’s foreign policy establishment has remained deeply entrenched despite the significant setbacks hawks have suffered since helping drive the country into war with Iraq. Using language that conjures images from the heyday of the Cold War, neoconservatives and other right-wing nationalists have endeavored to paint the administration as willing to sacrifice national security to achieve international acclaim. They have also drowned out more moderate voices in the Republican Party, whose realist views, although more in line with the policies pushed by the Obama administration, are failing to have an impact on conservative discourse.


China and America Jostle in Middle East

China is rapidly expanding its influence in the Middle East. Side-lined during the Cold War, Beijing now has both the economic wherewithal and the military muscle to be a force to reckon with in the region. The country is busy deepening its ties with regional powers, including many of America’s Arab allies as well as its regional foes, and challenging U.S.-Israeli dominance. What impact could this have on efforts to forge Middle East peace? And could the region become a battleground for a twenty-first century conflict between a rising China and a stagnant United States?


No Tea Parties for “Bibi”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s decision to arrive in Washington just in time to witness the dénouement in the showdown over healthcare reform was no coincidence. An obsessive consumer of Washington news and gossip—much of it filtered through the lens of U.S. rightwing interlocutors—Netanyahu likely thought he would meet the president just as the Age of Obama was coming to an end. Instead, he confronted a recharged leader angry over Israeli intransigence on settlements. While it is unlikely that current U.S.-Israeli tensions will lead to a long-term split, it is clear that “Bibi” will have to reassess his failed strategy of counting on rightwing allies to counterbalance pressure from the administration.


Who Are the “Eurocons”?

Neoconservatism is generally regarded as a distinctively American worldview that is characterized in part by a deep-seated belief in the moral righteousness of U.S. military force. Europeans, however, are increasingly using the term in their own foreign policy debates. These “Eurocons,” who can be found across the European political spectrum, see the continent embroiled in a Manichean struggle between western democracy and Islamist totalitarianism. However, while the neocons and their European cousins have some shared convictions, there are also many differences, and the Europeans themselves often disagree on many issues. So who exactly are the Eurocons?


The EMP Threat: Lots of Hype, Little Traction

In September, a network of hawks from the Christian Right to the neocons held a conference aimed at raising alarm about a purely theoretical threat. Titled “Protecting America Against Permanent Continental Shutdown From Electromagnetic Pulse,” the conference featured speakers who argued that “rogue” states like North Korea and Iran, as well as terrorists, are poised to wreak havoc on the United States by blasting nuclear weapons above the country, releasing an electromagnetic pulse that would shut down much of its infrastructure. That there is no evidence of EMP’s ostensibly far-reaching impact—or that anyone has developed EMP-optimized weapons—has not stopped hawks from making outlandish claims, like that within a year of an EMP attack, 9 out of 10 Americans would be dead. Despite the hype, it appears that only zealots take the threat seriously.


Neoconservative Resurgence in the Age of Obama

Despite their political plunge, neoconservatives—and the think tanks that sustain them—have been surprisingly skilled at reinventing themselves and forcing the Obama administration to give them a seat at the table. They have choreographed a clever “carrots and sticks” dance—throwing support behind the president when he has taken positions compatible with their dogma, and excoriating him when he has contravened it. They have also proved adept at making alliances with the liberal interventionists, like those at the Center for a New American Security, who are strikingly influential in and out of the Obama administration.


Waiting for Obama

Some Israelis fear that Barack Obama is the second coming of Charles de Gaulle—a leader of a powerful global patron who is willing to turn his back on the Jewish state if it goes to war with Arab neighbors. Thus far, however, the Obama administration has merely repeated long-held U.S. policy goals in the region, albeit ones that contrast sharply with the neoconservative-tendencies of the Bush presidency. As Middle East observers wait for Obama to launch his Middle East peace initiative in the coming months, they wonder, can the president fill the political vacuum in Israel and Palestine and start pressing the two sides to consider making painful compromises?


Why Iraq? The State of Debate on the Motives for the War

Even as the Obama administration ramps up military engagement in Afghanistan, the motives for why the country went to war in Iraq remain clouded in debate. The Bush administration’s discredited public rationale, that the country was threatened by Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, was at best only the tip of the iceberg, at worst a cynical attempt to cover up the actual motives for the war. A close inspection of the various arguments suggests that above all, the Iraq war was an extreme manifestation of a recent ideological tendency in U.S. foreign policy, and that the thinking that engendered it may not be fully in the rearview mirror.


Whither Af-Pak?

The near simultaneous reappointment of a sacked Supreme Court judge and the signing of an agreement to allow Sharia courts in certain areas have created a bewildering judicial divide in Pakistan. In this battle of the courts, however, there is a real opportunity for President Obama to take a new approach toward Pakistan and depart from the disastrous path cut by President George W. Bush and his predecessors. But unless President Obama listens to the people of Pakistan and recognizes the currents of change in this traumatized country, the administration’s strategy of linking Pakistan and Afghan policy—the so-called Af-Pak plan—could spark a spiraling conflict with devastating, far-reaching repercussions


U.S.-Iranian Engagement: When and How?

On Norouz, the day when Iranians celebrate the coming of spring and the new Iranian calendar year, President Barack Obama put the United States on a path to a fresh relationship with Iran. But given the upcoming Iranian presidential elections in June, the real question for the U.S. administration is when and how to further engage Iran. One thing is clear, the two countries have a number of shared concerns, which could provide them with a new basis for relations.


President Obama: A Realist Interventionist?

President Barack Obama might turn out to be a foreign policy pragmatist, eschewing the grand strategies and big-label crusades that inspire the minds of Washington’s cognoscenti. After eight years of the Bush administration’s foreign policy fantasies, the notion of an Obama administration muddling through foreign policy choices should be welcomed, even by those who will inevitably be disappointed when Obama fails to live up to their high expectations.


Cheney: Master Bureaucrat

Cheney has from the beginning served as the most aggressive hawk among the top administration leadership. His public pronouncements on the Iraq War have often gone farther than Bush himself was willing to. With secrecy and skill, Cheney used the Vice President’s office to unite the administration around shared goals of an aggressively nationalist foreign policy, a disdain for diplomacy, and an utterly unfettered executive power in time of war, as Barton Gellman documents in the recent biography Angler.


Neoconservatism in a New Era

With change coming to Washington in the form of a new president who campaigned on a slate of foreign policies at loggerheads with the agenda championed by President George W. Bush, a burning question among many pundits is, “Whither the neocons?” Out of power and out of fashion, what exactly will be their post-Bush agenda? Prominent thinkers Joshua Muravchik and Michael Ledeen weigh in on how neocons should move forward and what some of their priorities might be in the future.


Green Security?

Neoconservatives, despite their appreciable influence on President George W. Bush’s administration, have never numbered very many people. By forming tactical alliances and associations with groups like evangelical Christians and hardline nationalists to promote their policy goals, neocons became a powerful faction in Washington, D.C., especially after the 9/11 attacks. Now, with their influence clearly on the wane, some neocons seem to be trying to forge what might be their most unexpected alliance yet—with environmentalists.


Will Obama’s Change Come to Poor Corners of Kenya?

Wracked by the devastation wrought in the violent aftermath of their own presidential election a year ago, Kenyans across the country’s tribal and religious divisions have rejoiced in Barack Obama’s presidential win in the United States. But the euphoria inspired by the obvious symbolism of the election of a U.S. president with Kenyan heritage is heavily tempered by the burdens of everyday life and the question of whether Obama has the will and wherewithal to stop the excesses of the U.S.-led “war on terror” in East Africa.


The Economic Crisis: Will Money Trump Ideology?

The steep reversal of financial fortune for one of the most generous donors to hawkish causes could likely impact the ability of those causes to carry out their work. The fortune of casino mogul Sheldon Adelson, a key backer of groups like Freedom’s Watch and the Likud agenda in Israel, has taken a hit from the global economic meltdown. Will megadonors like Adelson turn their attention to salvaging their business empires at the expense of the political agendas dear to their hearts?


Losing Pakistan’s Hearts and Minds—and the “War on Terror”

Pakistan is facing one of the worst internal crises in its history. The turmoil—intimately tied to the Bush administration’s “war on terror”—is pushing Pakistani citizens against the tenuous U.S.-Pakistani alliance. The volatility of the relationship was underscored recently when members of U.S. and Pakistani forces exchanged fire. As U.S. strategists focus their military campaign on cross-border strikes against Taliban elements in Pakistani territory, they seem to be neglecting the plight of the average Pakistani. Without the hearts and minds of the population, Washington stands no chance of winning its war on terror on any front.


A Nowhere Foreign Policy Debate

This year’s race to the White House has been billed as a thing of historic proportions, and in terms of who will end up in the Oval Office, it certainly…


Chairman Lieberman’s “War on Terror”

Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the Independent Democrat from Connecticut who is closely affiliated with neoconservative-led advocacy efforts to push an expansive…


Going Soft on the Contractors?

The aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks proved a watershed moment for entrepreneurs intent on profiting from militarist U.S. foreign policies. The hawkish…


At A Crossroads with Syria

With ongoing peace talks between Israel and Syria, a new political settlement in Lebanon, and the specter of confrontation with Iran on the horizon, Middle…


Peace Not Near on Middle East’s “Time Horizon”

Members of Washington’s band of foreign policy realists are high-fiving each other these days. First there was the news that the Bush administration…


North Korea: Hand-Wringing over Success

The same neoconservatives who dominated the Bush administration for almost eight years are now screaming like stuck pigs over the administration’s latest moves on North…


Blackwater: The Real “Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy”?

Businessmen with ties to the GOP and right-wing ideologies and pedigrees are not uncommon. What makes Erik Prince special is the confluence of his core…


Iran Sanctions Bill Could Undermine Diplomacy

With pressure on both houses of Congress to pass legislation imposing more sanctions against Iran, and without key opposition from the oil lobby, the Iran…


PNAC: Please Contact the Billing/Support Department

The website of the Project for the New American Century went offline last month, spurring conspiratorial rumors regarding the once-prominent neoconservative…


Olmert Takes a Break; Hagee Wins Applause

Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, under fire at home for a deepening corruption scandal, left behind his political trouble in Israel for a two-day visit to hear Senators Barack…


Bush Visits His “New” Middle East

As he was drowning politically and personally in scandals that would lead eventually to a humiliating resignation from office…


Embedding the Analysts: Modern-Day Propaganda?

Over the course of the Iraq War, the Pentagon has used hand-picked retired military officers as “message force multipliers” to shape public opinion, a New York…


Time for a Diplomatic Surge

In the wake of the congressional hearings earlier this month featuring Gen. David Petraeus and Amb. Ryan Crocker, during which al Qaeda was hardly mentioned, it …


Bush’s Two-Man Song and Dance

Last week, the commander of the U.S. occupying forces in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus, and the overseer of what will be the largest embassy in the history of the …


Missing the Point in Pakistan

A missile strike on March 16 by an unmanned U.S. drone inside Pakistan’s terrorist-infested tribal areas shows Washington’s increasing frustration…


The Chutzpah Rewards: Iraq Five Years Along

Predictably, the fifth anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq is being marked with zeal by national media and Washington punditry. Is Iraq better today, five…


The Pitfalls of Forecasting Foreign Policy

After close to eight years during which the relationship between the United States and much of the international community has been dominated by tensions over …


An Early Look Ahead

Each of the three major presidential candidates left standing would make major changes to the national security and foreign policies carried out by…


Israel and Iran, After the NIE

“Iran is today the world’s leading state-sponsor of terror,” declared President George W. Bush in a speech given in Abu Dhabi, in…


Whither the Realists in 2008

As critics of George W. Bush’s foreign policy begin to count down the final days of his presidency, the big question is whether the realists…


Congress and National Security in 2007

On December 18, as Congress was about to head out of town, the Senate took three last votes on the war in Iraq. The outcome of the…


Bye, Bye Tora Bora; Hello Subprime Mortgages

The conventional wisdom de jour in Washington, DC, can be summed up in a catchphrase popularized by Bill Clinton’s 1992…


The Mideast Strategic-Consensus Fantasy

First, a flashback: On February 11, 1985, President Ronald Reagan welcomed Saudi Arabian King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz during a welcoming…


The Neocons on Pakistan: Neat, Simple, and Dangerously Naïve

Just as a flicker of hope emerged to bring back elected civilian rule to Pakistan, the ideological warriors of neoconservatism are up…


Look Who’s Downplaying Iran’s Nuclear Threat

Imagine Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice telling a group of leading U.S. policymakers that Iran’s nuclear weapons program does…


Congress and Iran: The New Iraq?

The drumbeat of a possible march to war with Iran reached a new intensity in recent weeks. Although the campaign is led by President…


America’s Africa Misadventure

This month, the Pentagon launched the U.S. Africa Command (Africom), spurring debate and showcasing two contrasting worldviews within…


Iraq After Petraeus: The More Things Change …

Many people in Washington thought that September would produce a marked change in the Iraq War policy. A number of Republicans who…


The Surge Scam: Getting Rid of the Goat

There is an old Jewish story about a man who lives in a very small house with his wife, many children, no space, and very little…


Iran and the Enduring Stockpile

In late July, U.S. presidential hopefuls discussed Iran’s uranium enrichment program at a news conference sponsored by the non-profit…


Dangerous Delusions

A television adaptation of Nebula Award-winning author John Kessel’s short story "A Clean Escape," which aired on ABC’s new sci-fi…


The United States and “Regime Change” in Iran

Though the Bush administration has repeatedly emphasized its desire for democratization and regime change in Iran, there are serious questions…


Whither the “Global Democratic Revolution”?

One of the neoconservatives’ lasting achievements was the construction of a new pillar of foreign policy—namely, democracy promotion….


Democrats Controlling Congress: A Six-Month Assessment

When they took control of both houses of Congress in November 2006, Democrats were determined to shake things up and advance an agenda that…


The New Politics of Political Aid in Venezuela

*This article was updated and corrected on August 17, 2007. Five years after U.S.-funded groups were associated with a failed coup…


Putting Friends in High Places

President George W. Bush’s decision to nominate Robert Zoellick as the new World Bank president continued the president’s pattern of…


The Right Gets Africa Wrong

When President George W. Bush announced the formation of a military command for Africa (AFRICOM) this past February, it came as no surprise to the…


Time to Ignore the Middle East?

These days, conventional wisdom in Washington, DC holds that the Iraq War has been lost, that the Bush Doctrine of promoting unilateral regime change…


The Political War Over the Iraq War

On May 24, Congress gave overwhelming approval to the Supplemental Appropriations Bill, which approves about $100 billion to fight the wars in Iraq…


Religious Right Rejects Giuliani

During the second GOP presidential debate, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani experienced what mainstream media pundits have termed the finest…


Democrats Remold Military Budget

While Congress has focused on the war in Iraq during the first four months of 2007, it has now begun to turn its attention to one of the two annual…


Last Days of the Bush Administration: Protecting the Legacy

Let us imagine for a moment that the years of George W. Bush as president have already passed us by, that it is perhaps 2017. In this imaginary time,…


The Conservative Credibility Test

What’s Fred Thompson got that Rudy and "Straight Talk" John don’t? For those excited about his likely decision to campaign for the…


Congress Wrestles With the Iraq War

On March 23, after a long, passionate debate, the House of Representatives voted 218-212 to mandate the withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq…


“A Great Little Racket”: The Neocon Media Machine

From high-brow intellectualism to tabloid spin, the neoconservative movement has evolved in ways that its early progenitors could hardly have imagined. The result is a well-oiled media machine that continues to impact policymaking, even as the neoconservatives themselves fall deeper into ill repute.


Pushing the Anti-Immigration Agenda Further Right

Republicans, like most Democrats, would prefer to keep immigration issues out of presidential politics. But restrictionist Rep. Tom Tancredo (R-CO)…


Africa: The Right’s Stuff

The full-page ads appearing in newspapers across the country are wrenching: children in the last stages of starvation, terrified refugees, and burned…


America’s Crusaders

Ideology and faith are stirring new calls to arms among influential political factions in the United States. At a time when the U.S. public is…


Is Washington Being Sidelined on the Middle East?

Once upon a time, an American president would have been a leader in the effort to bring peace between Israel and its neighbors, since, after all,…


Gingrich at the Gate

Although Newt Gingrich, the former Republican Speaker of the House of Representatives who was forced to relinquish his post over a series of ethical…


Somalia in the Crosshairs

After the swift fall of Somalia’s Islamic Courts Union (ICU) in December 2006, the capital city of Mogadishu has slid back into the familiar,…


Expanding the War to Iran: Another “Urban Legend?”

Rejecting the notion that the United States was planning to attack Iran and Syria, White House Spokesman Tony Snow called it a myth or an “urban…


A Look at the 110th Congress

When the 110th Congress was sworn in on January 4, a new cast took charge, making very complicated dynamics the rule for the next two years. Although…


The Push behind the Surge

President George W. Bush’s plan to “surge” more than 20,000 additional U.S. troops into Iraq without any deadline for withdrawal has…


Year in Review: Congress Weak on National Security

When Congress slunk out of town early the morning of Saturday, December 9, it left behind a mixed record on national security issues. On some of the…


The Baker-Hamilton Recommendations: Too Little, Too Late?

One of Aesop’s fables recounts how once upon a time Mount Ida, the birthplace of Zeus, experienced a huge earthquake. “The earth commenced to…


The China Syndrome-A Bipartisan Ailment

What does Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) have in common with national security hawks at the country’s leading right-wing think tanks? . …


The Rise and Decline of the Neoconservatives

Summary: Shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States, an influential, neoconservative-led pressure group called the…


Rumors of a Neocon Death Are Highly Exaggerated

There is an element of Schadenfreude in the reaction of critics of Washington’s neoconservatives to the policy setbacks and ideological…


Space: The Phantom Menace

The October publication of President George W. Bush’s new space policy marked a definitive victory in a long-fought campaign by right-wing hawks to…


Midterms: A Modest Change, Maybe

While the November 7 midterm election will doubtless change the atmospherics in Washington, DC, it is unlikely to have a significant impact on…


Selective Proliferation

One of the Bush administration’s top foreign policy priorities before the end of the year is to secure congressional approval of the U.S.-India…


The Henry WhoSociety

Two groups in Britain urge foreign policies that reflect key aspects of the American neoconservative agenda. One group has even adopted the name of…


The Blame Game

Stumping for Republican candidates across the country in recent weeks, Vice President Dick Cheney has honed in on a particular message: Terrorists…


A New Kind of Neocon?

Nikolas Gvosdev, editor of the National Interest, a foreign policy magazine affiliated with the Nixon Center in Washington, DC, has recently been…


The Politics of Fear

The recently released staff report on Iran issued by the Republican-controlled House Intelligence Committee and the new National Intelligence…


The End Times Agenda

This past June, the Israeli Embassy in Washington held a reception for several high-powered leaders of the Christian right. Among those attending the…


John Bolton: Forgotten, But Not Gone

John Bolton’s renomination as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations appears moribund as Congress finishes its final session before the…


DIY Energy Policy

Divergent political camps have found common ground in support of “energy security” and “energy independence.” As high gas prices and…


A Real Clean Break in the Middle East

In 1996, a group of American neoconservatives participated in a study group organized by the Israel-based Institute for Advanced Strategic and…


Protecting the Paradigm

If asked to point to the main victims of the recent crisis in the Middle East, most objective observers might express sympathy for the innocent…


Tacking Right?

As the midterm elections approach, the Democrats must decide where they stand. Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) stood his ground-supporting the Iraq War…


Abrams in Jerusalem

During the 35-day conflict between Israel and Hezbollah, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice was accompanied on her shuttle diplomacy to the region…


Playing Cowboy-and Falling off the Horse

U.S. President George W. Bush has fancied himself playing Gary Cooper’s role in High Noon. Yep, Sheriff W. and his loyal deputy Tony B. ride into…


The Expanding Anti-Immigration Bandwagon

This summer, the immigration debate in the United States has heated up as conservatives of all tendencies-social conservatives, neoconservatives,…


Could the Midterm Elections Spell an End to Military Follies?

For more than five years, the Bush administration’s aggressive and unilateral national security policies have been triumphant in the United…


State of Schizophrenia

Over the past year and a half, the State Department has reemerged as the preeminent force in U.S. foreign relations, one that on the surface seems…


The Neocons Are Talking War-Again

The neocons are largely united over Iran policy, which they say should have three pillars: avoid diplomacy, which they call appeasing the…


Tom Tancredo-Christian Crusader, Cultural Nationalist, and Iran Freedom Fighter

Rep. Tom Tancredo, the leading voice of the immigration restrictionist movement, believes that the United States should wall in our borders, launch a…


Iran Freedom and Regime Change Politics

At a time when the Republican Party is divided on immigration reform and when the Democrats and the Republicans are positioning themselves for the…


2006: A Banner Year for Prosecuting Republicans?

If the month of January is a sign of Bush administration troubles to come in 2006, it could be a banner year for prosecutors hot on the trail of…


Tom Tancredo: Leader of the Anti-Immigrant Populist Revolt

Rep. Tom Tancredo, who has represented Colorado’s Sixth District since 1999, has in the last six years succeeded in rallying an anti-immigrant…


Neocons—Down but Not Out

Corrected on June 6, 2006. Of all the personnel changes that have occurred in the Bush administration during the first year of the…


Pitting Elite Interests against the Rule of Law

If people know of Sibel Edmonds at all, they know her as an FBI whistleblower. Since mid-2002, her face has graced newspapers across America;…


The Glue that Binds the Movement

They are the glue that binds American conservatism—in all its flavors: neoconservative, libertarian, evangelical, triumphalist—into an…


Toeing an Illegal Line

With John Roberts seemingly a shoo-in for the Supreme Court, Republicans can hardly be blamed for their excitement on the legal front, which was…


The New Crusade of the Democratic Globalists

One of the major achievements of the neoconservatives over the past two decades has been to integrate the missionary impulses of liberal…


World Movement for Democracy-Made in the USA

The “world’s democratic movement” is not another one of the transnational citizens’ movements, like the anti-globalization…


Nuclear Warrior Replaces John Bolton as Arms Control Chief

The top U.S. government official in charge of arms control advocates the offensive use of nuclear weapons and has deep roots in the militarist…


Cheney’s Man Slated to Replace Feith

A career diplomat and foreign policy operative, Eric S. Edelman is slated to replace the controversial Douglas …


Moving Backward with Move America Forward

Move America Forward (MAF), a California-based advocacy group, believes that moving the country forward requires kicking the United Nations out of…


The Religious Right Determining U.S. Foreign Policy

When Americans ponder why the rest of the world regards it with less respect, they could turn to the recent controversy created by the U.S….


Rest Assured—We Will Now Have “Good Intelligence”

Since the founding of the CIA in 1947, it has been under attack, mainly from the right. Although left-center charges that the CIA has engineered…


Full-Throttle Unipolarity

Just two weeks ago conventional wisdom both here and in European capitals was that President George W. Bush’s second term would see a modest turn…


Bush’s PR Person to Direct U.S. Public Diplomacy

The most intriguing aspect of U.S. President George W. Bush’s nomination of Karen Hughes to take charge of Washington’s public diplomacy apparatus–and…


John Negroponte—Policy Hack or Intelligence Reformer?

The CIA has long been caught in the crossfire from the left and the right. Human rights critics and left-center internationalists have charged that…


New Homeland Security Czar’s Legal Dragnet

Michael Chertoff, who served as the head of the Justice Department’s criminal division under Attorney General John Ashcroft, has replaced Tom…


The Rise, Fall, and Rise Again of Elliott Abrams

Elliott Abrams, a figure from the Ronald Reagan-era Iran-Contra scandal who describes himself as a “neo-conservative and neo-Reaganite,” is…


The Foreign Policy Diaspora-From Jerusalem to Washington

The State of the Union Address and Bush’s second Inaugural Address focused U.S. and international attention on Natan Sharansky, author of The…


Neocons and Liberals Together, Again

The neoconservative Project for the New American Century (PNAC) has signaled its intention to continue shaping the government’s national security…


Hardliner Hadley Named New National Security Adviser

Stephen Hadley is a fire-tested Vulcan–a hardliner close to Vice President Dick Cheney and to the neoconservative camp. Named by the president in…


Is Iran Next?

Shortly after 9/11, Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Douglas Feith began coordinating Pentagon planning for a regime change in Iraq. The…


Coalition for Democracy in Iran

Overview The Coalition for Democracy in Iran (CDI) is one of numerous pressure groups created by neoconservatives that focus on changing…


Douglas Feith: Portrait of a Neoconservative

Feith served as the number three civilian in the George W. Bush administration’s Defense Department, under Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Wolfowitz….


9/11 Commissioner John Lehman on the War Path

Blame the CIA. That’s a political agenda that has found bipartisan support in Congress. Both the right and the left saw the departure of CIA…


Liberal Hawks: Flying in Neocon Circles

In the heat of Iraq the neoconservatives are seeing their visions of Pax Americana turn into nightmares and headaches. But they are not alone….


The Right’s Architecture of Power

(This is the third article in the Chronicle of the New American Century series written by Tom Barry for the Right Web project of the Interhemispheric…


Final Statement of the BRussells Tribunal

(The following is the final statement of the BRussells Tribunal, an international commission of inquiry held in Brussels on April 14-17, 2004. Tom Barry, policy…


Pax Americana—What’s the Alternative

(In the interests of explaining the logic of the foreign policy agenda developed by the Project for the New American Century (PNAC) and of sparking…


When Democracy Promotion Turns Partisan

A not-so-fine line exists between foreign support to foster democratization and the direct funding of a single political party. The first type of…


Long Live NATO

The cold war is long over, but with the support of U.S. supremacists in both parties NATO lives on as America’s global cop.. …


Thought Control for Middle East Studies

A band of neoconservative pundits with close ties to Israel have mounted a campaign against American scholars who study the Middle East. Martin…


One Year After the Invasion: Baghdad and Beyond

(Editor’s Note: This is the second in a series of investigative reports on the influence of a web of right-wing organizations and…


The NATO Expansion Lobby

(Return to the original article, Baghdad and Beyond, available online at rightweb.irc-online.org/rw/764.). Bruce Jackson, of the…


Leo Strauss and Intelligence Strategy

Abram Shulsky and Gary Schmitt credit the teachings of Leo Strauss, a German Jewish émigré philosopher, with helping them conceptualize…


Office of Special Plans

In the days after September 11 terrorist attacks, Paul Wolfowitz and Douglas Feith started cooking intelligence to meet the needs of the radically…


Basic Instincts, Not the Truth: Iraq War Product of Neocon Philosophy of Intelligence

(The first in a series of investigative reports on influence of a web of right-wing organizations and individuals–chiefly associated with the…


Right Web of Intelligence Reformers

Abram Shulsky and Gary Schmitt have shuttled back and forth between government and right-wing institutes like the NSIC. In 2000 Shulsky was a member…


Remembering Team B

The most notorious attempt by militarists and right-wing ideologues to challenge the CIA was the Team B affair in the mid-1970s. The 1975-76…


Sen. Hillary Clinton, L. Paul Bremer and Americans for Victory over Terrorism, Paul Wolfowitz, James

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been one of the few U.S. politicians willing to depart from accepted political discourse and announce, as she did…


Realists v. Hawks: Baker Returns

It may be that four or five months from now:. Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz will have heard the siren song of…


Culture, Religion, Apocalypse, and Middle East Foreign Policy

It’s hard to believe, but the Bush administration’s foreign policy and the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq are influenced by the…


Selective Service

In the growing debate over whether the Bush administration should get “boots on the ground” in the war-torn West African nation of Liberia, the neoconservatives who…


The Right Flexes Muscle with New U.S. Agenda

We meet here during a crucial period in the history of [the United States], and of the civilized world. Part of that history was written by…


Glossary of Right-Wing Sectors

Understanding politics in America and U.S. foreign policy means knowing about the right wing. The leading ideologues and strategists of the right wing–who hail from such groups as the Project for the New American Century, American Enterprise Institute, and Empower America—have set the hawkish and unilateralist direction of the Bush foreign and military policy. Anticommunists:…

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Featured Profiles

John Yoo is a former deputy assistant attorney general known for his extreme views on executive wartime powers and for helping author the George W. Bush administration’s infamous “torture memos.”


A self-styled terrorism “expert” who claims that the killing of Osama bin Laden strengthened Al Qaeda, former right-wing Lebanese militia member Walid Phares wildly claims that the Obama administration gave the Muslim Brotherhood “the green light” to sideline secular Egyptians.


Frank Gaffney, director of the hardline neoconservative Center for Security Policy, is a longtime advocate of aggressive U.S. foreign policies, bloated military budgets, and confrontation with the Islamic world.


Ilan Berman is vice president of the American Foreign Policy Council, a think tank that promotes hawkish security polices and appears to be closely associated with the U.S. “Israel Lobby.”


Randal Fort, an assistant secretary for intelligence and research in the State Department during the second term of George W. Bush’s presidency, is director at the Raytheon Corporation.


Robert Kagan, a cofounder of the Project for the New American Century, is a neoconservative policy pundit and historian based at the Brookings Institution.


A neoconservative pundit and former federal prosecutor, McCarthy argues that Islam is inherently radical and thus a threat to the United States.


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From the Wires

The United States needs to undertake the same type of investigation that condemned former Prime Minister Tony Blair’s decision-making during the lead up to the Iraq War.


A recent spate of high-casualty Islamic State-linked attacks has raised fears about the group’s ability to carry out international terrorist strikes while also obscuring its failures at creating a “state.”


Is Hillary Clinton’s hawkishness on foreign policy due to core principles or political calculation?


In minimizing U.S. resort to violence, President Obama has brought conflict resolution to the Oval Office.


Whatever influence the United States seeks from sanctions depends on demonstrating that those targeted will get relief if they take the required actions, otherwise there is no incentive for change.


From spending $150 million on private villas for a handful of personnel in Afghanistan to blowing $2.7 billion on an air surveillance balloon that doesn’t work, the latest revelations of waste at the Pentagon are just the most recent howlers in a long line of similar stories stretching back at least five decades.


We need a peaceful international environment to rebuild our country. To achieve this, we must erase our strategy deficit. To do that, the next administration must fix the broken policymaking apparatus in Washington.


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